Behavior Change

Article

Leading By Example: Godfrey Nkutu Mpala is Improving Sanitation in his Community

Godfrey’s decision to invest in a toilet was derived from the love for his community and the fact that he is a leader who aspires to lead by example.

“Good sanitation is good for us all. On this note every person who comes to my hardware store is encouraged to improve their sanitation.” Says Godfrey Nkutu Mapala. Godfrey is the village chairman of Kibinga A who decided to invest in an improved toilet with a cement floor fixed with a SATO pan after attending a masons training.

Interagency Story

Sustainable Solutions Improve Hand Hygiene among Health Care Workers

In 2018 and 2019, the CDC collaborated with the IDI of Makerere University, IRC-WASH, and a district government of Uganda to implement and evaluate the feasibility and impact of local production and district-wide distribution of ABHR on health care worker hand hygiene. This evaluation took place in Kabarole District in western Uganda, where CDC conducted a district-wide assessment of water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) in health care facilities in 2018 and found that access to water and soap was limited and health care worker hand hygiene compliance was very low. 

Case Studies

Promoting Latrine Sales in CLTS Interventions through Integrated Sanitation Marketing

In 2015, after a decade of approaching rural sanitation by subsidizing latrine construction with minimal results, the Government of Senegal launched a new strategy for rural sanitation defined by a transfer of responsibility for the acquisition of sanitation services to communities. This created an opportunity for market-based approaches for increased sanitation outcomes.

LiteratureReview

Menstrual Hygiene Management and Women's Economic Empowerment: A Review of Existing Evidence

To better understand the experiences of working women globally, USAID’s Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Partnerships and Learning for Sustainability (WASHPaLS) project conducted a review of the limited evidence on the adequacy of menstrual hygiene management (MHM) in the workplace to identify the cost-effectiveness, sustainability, and scalability of approaches to improve conditions. This report presents the findings of the review and describes some of the challenges experienced by working women and provides guidance for future investments.

Water Currents

Water Currents: WASH and Neglected Tropical Diseases

The provision of safe water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) is recognized as both a key intervention and a necessary component for the prevention and provision of care for all neglected tropical diseases. USAID’s Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTD) Program in the Bureau for Global Health contributed content and suggested this topic as a way to highlight the first-ever World NTD Day on January 30, 2020.

Blog

Comparing the Sustainability of Different Approaches to Rural WASH Access

The goal of rural water and sanitation investments is sustainable, long-term solutions to service challenges—yet donors and practitioners rarely measure the durability of project outcomes. Evaluations conducted midstream or shortly after project completion fail to adequately capture what water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) approaches are sustainable.

Blog

Are Nudges the Answer to Improving Handwashing Behavior?

While handwashing has been acknowledged as a way to prevent the spread of infection, experts agree that we still aren’t making enough progress on increasing uptake of this behavior. A systematic review revealed that in 2015, only 26 percent of people globally washed their hands with soap after contact with feces.

Brief

Brief: Millennium Water and Sanitation Program (PEPAM/USAID) Ex-Post Evaluation

This brief outlines the key findings from an ex-post evaluation of the Millennium Water and Sanitation Program in Senegal (PEPAM/USAID – Programme d’Eau Potable et d’Assainissement du Millénaire au Sénégal). Implemented from 2009–2014 by Research Triangle Institute (RTI) and a consortium of partners, PEPAM aimed to improve sustainable access to water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) in four regions of Senegal.