Ethiopia

Technical Brief

Sustaining Rural Water: A Comparative Study of Maintenance Models for Community-Managed Schemes

As rural water supply coverage rates rise across many countries, attention is increasingly being paid to finding and implementing cost-effective mechanisms to ensure this improved initial access is sustained over time. Conventional approaches to maintenance have largely been based on voluntary community-based management with communities taking on the burden of maintenance themselves, with limited, if any, support from external agencies or local government. Recently, there have been attempts to professionalize maintenance services and make these services affordable at the point of delivery.

Evaluation

Final Performance Evaluation: Strengthening Ethiopia’s Urban Health Activity

USAID)Ethiopia designed the Strengthening Ethiopia’s Urban Health (SEUH) Activity to support the Government of Ethiopia’s Urban Health Extension Program (UHEP) by improving the quality of urban health services, strengthening referral linkages, building the institutional and technical capacity of regional health bureaus, and promoting intersectoral collaboration on urban health challenges. Using a mixed-methods approach, this final performance evaluation examines SEUH design, implementation, effectiveness, and sustainability. The evaluation findings and recommendations can guide the U.S.

Brief

Stakeholder-Driven Factor Mapping for WASH Systems

The Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership (SWS) is piloting factor mapping workshops to improve stakeholders’ understanding of complex WASH systems and align their perspectives on the key components and the interactions between them that lead to improved service delivery outcomes. Factor mapping is a type of focus group activity that enables participants to visually represent the interactions between different factors in a system.

Evaluation

Millennium Water Alliance (MWA) Water, Sanitation And Hygiene (WASH) Program In Ethiopia – External Program Evaluation

This report presents results of the evaluation of the Ethiopia Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) Program, implemented from 2004 to 2009. The program funded by USAID, in cooperation with the Millennium Water Alliance (MWA). At the time of the evaluation the program was being implemented through eight international MWA partners and four local sub-contractor NGOs in 30 woredas (districts) in Ethiopia.

Annual Report Story

Sensor Monitoring Keeps the Water Flowing in Ethiopia's Lowlands

In the harsh, arid lowlands of Ethiopia, USAID is working with the government to accelerate progress on its One WASH National Program to increase access to basic water services to 83 percent of its population. In the mostly pastoral communities where the USAID Lowland WASH Activity is based, water sources are few and far between, and even when available, those sources may not be functioning or dispensing safe water.

Report

Resilience in Action: Changing Horizons in Ethiopia's Drylands

Ethiopia’s enormous pastoral population is estimated at 12 to 15 million people, the majority of whom live in the arid or semi-arid drylands that cover about 60 percent of the country. Following the famine of 2003— that left one-fifth of Ethiopia’s population without food and tens of thousands dead from starvation—USAID used the funding for the famine response to initiate the Pastoralists Livelihoods program to improve and strengthen the status of this population. This established the foundation and basis of our interventions in these regions.

Project

Sustainable Water and Sanitation in Africa

The Sustainable Water and Sanitation in Africa (SUWASA) program was designed to improve access to safe, reliable, affordable, and sustainable water and sanitation services for unserved and underserved urban populations in sub-Sahara Africa. The program fostered urban water sector reforms to solve policy, institutional, regulatory, financial, and operational challenges that hindered the effective delivery of sustainable water and sanitation services for urban residents in nine African nations.

Final Report

Sustainable Water and Sanitation in Africa (SUWASA) – Final Report

The Sustainable Water and Sanitation in Africa (SUWASA) program was implemented from 2005–2009 to improve access to safe, reliable, affordable, and sustainable water and sanitation services for unserved and underserved urban populations in sub-Sahara Africa. The program fostered urban water sector reforms to solve policy, institutional, regulatory, financial, and operational challenges that hindered the effective delivery of sustainable water and sanitation services for urban residents in nine African nations.