Ethiopia

Article

Applying the “Internet of Things” to Water Systems

In many respects, Ethiopia’s lowlands represent the final frontier for the country’s ambitious plans to improve WASH coverage through its One WASH National Program. These harsh, arid lands are home to predominantly pastoral communities that roam with their livestock in search of water and grazing lands. Adding to these challenges are the pressures of regular droughts, depleted groundwater tables, and a lack of institutional capacity on the human and data side.

Article

Developing Groundwater Maps for Arid Regions of Kenya and Ethiopia

With funding provided by USAID, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and its partners are combining geospatial data from remote sensing with traditional hydrogeological methods to map groundwater resources in two study areas in Kenya and Ethiopia. The primary goals of the project are to locate and quantify the groundwater aquifers in order to support sustainable management of the resource and generate higher success rate when drilling water supply wells, as well training local water resources agency staff and others on the methodology used to develop the maps.

Article

Providing Scientifically Robust Tools for Global Water Security

Understanding the state of global water and implications for U.S. national security requires strategic coordination of the best available science and technical capabilities across the U.S. Government. Spurred by the call for greater interagency collaboration to help address global water security challenges, the Interagency Water Working Group Science and Applications Team (ISAT) was formed by NASA, U.S. Army Corp of Engineers Engineer Research and Development Center (USACE-ERDC), and U.S.

Article

Enhancing Media Coverage of Water Issues in Africa and the Middle East

With funding from the U.S. Department of State, the U.S. Agency for Global Media (USAGM) has trained nearly 30 journalists from the Nile Basin and across the Middle East on a variety of water issues. The trainings built capacity among journalists who often do not have the resources to focus on a single topical issue, such as water. This project represented whole-of-government thinking resulting in an U.S. government interagency project that impacts millions of people by bringing them reliable news and information about water issues. 

Article

Improved Chlorination Mitigates Disease Outbreaks

Access to safe drinking water is critical in preventing transmission of waterborne diseases. The benefits of using chlorine as a disinfectant in emergencies and waterborne disease outbreaks include low cost, high availability, and ease of monitoring. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) specialists have assisted Ministries of Water and Health and other partners to improve chlorination and water quality monitoring in Ethiopia, Bangladesh, Sierra Leone, Zambia, and Zimbabwe during outbreaks and emergencies.

Article

Hydrologists Without Borders

Through a cooperative program with the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs (OES), the U.S. Water Partnership (USWP) has deployed U.S. hydrologists and water experts abroad for short-term consultancies, training programs, and public diplomacy missions. The program, termed by one expert participant as “Hydrologists without Borders,” helps U.S. embassies build cooperation and support for critical water issues in key countries, and has served as a new avenue for U.S. embassies to market U.S.

Blog

A New Approach to Address Urban Sanitation Shortcomings

In December, John Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies joined with USAID implementer AECOM to host a panel discussion on Citywide Inclusive Sanitation (CWIS), a topic of particular interest as USAID expands its focus and shifts its thinking on how to address sanitation.