Ghana

Project

WASH for the Urban Poor II

Water Access Sanitation and Hygiene for the Urban Poor (WASH-UP), funded by USAID, helped to improve availability and access to water and sanitation services in three slum communities of Accra and two slum communities in the urban area of Sekondi-Takoradi. Using a community-driven approach that involved residents and a broad range of stakeholders, Global Communities implemented programs to create sustainable improvements in water and sanitation access while improving hygiene behaviors. 

Project

Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) for Health

Despite recent sanitation successes and the introduction of promising technologies, roughly 85 percent of Ghanaians still lack access to improved sanitation. This gap in coverage has led to recurring cholera outbreaks in recent years. Ghana is now tackling its sanitation challenges with renewed vigor, and intensifying efforts to scale up sanitation improvements nationwide with the help of the USAID-funded Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) for Health initiative 

Global Waters Article

Seeking New Ways to Expand Sanitation for the Urban Poor in West Africa

Global Waters in Focus | An In-Depth Look at USAID's SSD Project Overview

Locations: Benin, Côte d’Ivoire, and Ghana
Duration: 2014–2019
Implementing Partners: Population Services International (PSI), PATH, and Water and Sanitation for the Urban Poor (WSUP)

 

Central Program

Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Partnerships and Learning for Sustainability

The Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Partnerships and Learning for Sustainability (WASHPaLS) project is a five-year (2016–2021) Task Order working to improve water supply, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) programming by identifying, researching and sharing best practices for the delivery of WASH services and sustained behavior change. WASHPaLS supports the Agency’s goal of reducing morbidity and mortality in children under five as part of the Ending Preventable Child and Maternal Deaths initiative.

Global Waters Article

Innovative Ghanaian Latrine Makes Sanitation Aspirational

Ghana is a country of jarring contradictions. Technology is quickly infiltrating daily lives: nearly everyone has a mobile phone, the majority have access to electricity, and millions use the internet. But less than 15 percent of the country has access to basic sanitation, and one in five Ghanaians defecate in the open.