urban

Event

Urban Sanitation: Meeting the SDGs for Universal Access by 2030

In preparation for the United Nations’ World Toilet Day on November 19, 2016, SID-W, together with AECOM, has assembled a panel of experts to discuss experiences and prospects for achieving universal access to sanitation for urban populations by 2030.

Central Program

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Finance

Globally, 663 million people do not have access to safe drinking water and 2.4 billion people lack access to improved sanitation. Governments have set ambitious targets for universal access to water and sanitation by the year 2030, but an unprecedented mobilization of funding will be required to meet this goal. A 2016 analysis by the World Bank estimates that $114 billion per year of capital investment will be required to meet universal access to safely managed water and sanitation services by 2030, or about three times the current investment levels.

Website

LandLinks

We envision a world in which land governance systems, both formal and informal, are effective, accessible, and responsive for all.

Activity

Indonesia Urban Water and Sanitation Hygiene

Urban areas across Indonesia have reached a critical juncture. Despite high levels of economic growth, access to basic services such as water supply and sanitation services are exceptionally low, especially for the urban poor. Only 37 percent of urbanites have access to piped water supply and only 69 percent have access to the most basic sanitation. Most notably, coverage in several areas is falling even further behind as urban population growth outstrips the ability of most local governments to expand service coverage.

Global Waters Article

Improving Water Supplies and Sanitation Services in East Africa

Proximity to Lake Victoria — the second largest freshwater body in the world — has not eased the water-related stress of the five East African Community (EAC) Partner States that surround it. Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda have all experienced rapid, unplanned expansion of secondary towns, which has increased competition for water. Urban water distribution systems are inefficient and suffer from excessive systemic water losses. These factors have left the region struggling to increase the resiliency and sustainability of its water and sanitation services.

Evaluation

Indonesia Urban Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Mid-Term Evaluation Review - Final Report

At the mid-point of the project, IUWASH is now well advanced towards meeting its objectives. Its contributions are much appreciated by central government, not only for its support to the water and sanitation sectors in respect of its own statement of work, but also because of its leverage of other GOI and donor investments and technical assistance, particularly so in respect of the evolving sanitation sector.

Evaluation

USAID/India Health of the Urban Poor Program Mid-Term Evaluation Report

In India, the urban poor are among the fastest growing and especially vulnerable sub-populations, having limited access to clean water, sanitation, and health care. Despite compelling need, urban health has not been a priority issue and receives less attention than rural health care.

Evaluation

Liberia Municipal Water Project Mid-Term Performance Evaluation

USAID is currently implementing the four-year Liberia Municipal Water Project (LMWP), a unique project opportunity and a foundational investment that not only addresses urban water supply infrastructure needs, but also sets the stage for a community-based and a decentralized approach for water supply management that can foster sustainable operation and maintenance (O&M) for the recommended capital improvements.