fecal sludge management

Blog

Facilitation Makes the Difference in Sanitation

Muhammed Ibrahim is a local facilitator in Ethiopia working on USAID’s Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership (SWS). His job is to improve the sanitation systems in the small towns of Debre Birhan and Woliso using an unconventional approach. He isn’t building toilets or educating people on the need for safe sanitation. Instead, Muhammed and his team are supporting local government staff, residents, and private companies to work together to address complex systematic issues as a collective. This approach is called collective action.

Evaluation

Final Performance Evaluation: Strengthening Ethiopia’s Urban Health Activity

USAID)Ethiopia designed the Strengthening Ethiopia’s Urban Health (SEUH) Activity to support the Government of Ethiopia’s Urban Health Extension Program (UHEP) by improving the quality of urban health services, strengthening referral linkages, building the institutional and technical capacity of regional health bureaus, and promoting intersectoral collaboration on urban health challenges. Using a mixed-methods approach, this final performance evaluation examines SEUH design, implementation, effectiveness, and sustainability. The evaluation findings and recommendations can guide the U.S.

Annual Report Story

Making Sludge Removal a Better Business

In West Africa, sanitation access for the urban poor is extremely low. A significant portion of the population living in informal settlements resort to open defecation, and those that have sanitation access often share a poorly maintained latrine with multiple families. Cholera outbreaks are not unusual. And prohibitive prices for fecal sludge collection services—a necessity for the type of onsite sanitation in these neighborhoods—stop many landlords and poor households from investing in latrines and proper waste disposal.

Fact Sheet

Fact Sheet: West Africa Sanitation Service Delivery (SSD)

Some of the lowest rates of improved sanitation in the world are found in three project countries: Benin (13 percent), Côte d’Ivoire (14 percent), and Ghana (28 percent). Each country lacks affordable options for safe disposal and treatment of human waste. Densely populated areas, such as slum communities, have limited space to construct household toilets and land disputes coupled with a lack of urban planning complicate this problem.

Manual

Implementer's Guide to Lime Stabilization for Septage Management in the Philippines

This manual is meant to be helpful for cities as it features a step-by-step procedure for establishing a septage management program using a combination of hydrated lime slurry and sand drying beds as the main treatment process. The manual captures the experience of Tacloban City, Philippines, which employed the system following Typhoon Yolanda to treat septage and sewage collected from evacuation centers and other temporary shelters.

Report

Evaluating the Potential of Container-Based Sanitation

In the face of urbanization, alternative approaches are needed to deliver adequate and inclusive sanitation services across the full sanitation service chain. Container-based sanitation (CBS) consists of an end-to-end service—that is, one provided along the whole sanitation service chain—that collects excreta hygienically from toilets designed with sealable, removable containers and strives to ensure that the excreta is safely treated, disposed of, and reused.

Fact Sheet

USAID's WASH-FIN Nepal

Building a foundation of commercial approaches and new institutional models to close financing gaps to achieving universal access to water and sanitation services.