FHI 360

LiteratureReview

Integrating WASH into NTD Programs: A Desk Review

The USAID Neglected Tropical Disases (NTD) program has programs to eliminate and/or control NTDs in 24 countries. Even as NTDs are eliminated through mass drug administration, the reinfection of these diseases will remain a problem if behaviors and the environment remain unchanged. STH, schistosomiasis, and trachoma are all clearly linked to inadequate sanitation, contaminated food and water, and poor hygiene, providing an opportunity for water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) related approaches to help change behavior and the environment.

Webinar Slides

The Contribution of Community-Led Total Sanitation To Ending Open Defecation

On Wednesday, December 13, 2017, the USAID-funded Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Partnerships and Learning for Sustainability (WASHPaLS) Project held a webinar on the role of community-led total sanitation (CLTS) in helping to end open defecation. WASHPaLS presented key findings from a desk review assessing the knowledge base on CLTS program performance. The findings and identified evidence gaps will inform the WASHPaLS research agenda for subsequent years of the project. 

 

Event

Webinar: Designing Effective Sanitation Enterprises

The USAID-funded Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Partnerships and Learning for Sustainability (WASHPaLS) Project invites you to a presentation and discussion on sanitation enterprises and design considerations. WASHPaLS will present a detailed discussion of the elements of a sanitation enterprise including mechanisms and practices, design approaches, and key considerations based upon the findings a recent WASHPaLS desk review.

Report

Information and Communication Technology for Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS): A Landscape Assessment

The USAID Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Partnerships and Learning for Sustainability (WASHPaLS) Project carried out this landscape assessment of information communication technology (ICT) use cases in the water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) sector as an initial step toward understanding the demand and potential use for development or customization of a technology solution to support large-scale implementation and/or monitoring of CLTS programs.

Blog

Webinar Addresses Underemphasized Health Risks Children Face in Their Home Environments

For decades, implementers have applied water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) and nutrition-based interventions—alone and in a variety of combinations—to address diarrheal disease and stunting among infants and young children (IYC) in low- and middle-income countries. Given the extensive and intensive efforts, why aren’t we seeing more progress?

Central Program

Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Partnerships and Learning for Sustainability

The Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Partnerships and Learning for Sustainability (WASHPaLS) project is a five-year (2016–2021) Task Order working to improve water supply, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) programming by identifying, researching and sharing best practices for the delivery of WASH services and sustained behavior change. WASHPaLS supports the Agency’s goal of reducing morbidity and mortality in children under five as part of the Ending Preventable Child and Maternal Deaths initiative.

Event

Webinar Announcement: Toward a Hygienic Environment for Infants and Young Children

USAID is holding a webinar to discuss findings from the recent report, Toward a Hygienic Environment for Infants and Young Children: A Review of the Literature.

USAID recently completed this review of the scientific and grey literature to capture the state of knowledge of the health risks to infants and young children from fecal exposure in their home environments, focusing on historically underemphasized sources and transmission pathways not disrupted by the traditional suite of WASH measures.

LiteratureReview

Toward a Hygienic Environment for Infants and Young Children: A Review of the Literature

The USAID Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Partnerships and Learning for Sustainability (WASHPaLS) project conducted a review of the scientific and grey literature, complemented by dozens of key informant interviews with researchers and field implementers, to synthesize the latest understanding of key pathways of fecal microbe ingestion by infants and young children (IYC) and their links to diarrhea, EED, and poor nutrition and development outcomes.

Specifically, the review sought to:

Blog

The Global Handwashing Partnership: Leading the Way for Handwashing with Soap Action

The Global Handwashing Partnership (GHP) envisions a world where everyone consistently and frequently washes their hands with clean water and soap. In that world, children don’t needlessly suffer and die from diarrheal diseases and acute respiratory infections, patients and health care staff have much lower risks of infections in health settings, and women and girls have access to hygiene facilities to safely manage their menstruation with dignity.