Environmental Incentives

Case Studies

Presentation: Using Network Analysis to Understand Alignment Toward Collective Action

At University of North Carolina’s 2018 Water and Health Conference, University of Colorado Boulder's Kimberly Pugel presented two case studies to highlight a method SWS is using to visualize the priorities of each actor within a network by combining standard network analysis with qualitative interviews. SWS partners are seeking to strengthen these networks of agencies, organizations, service providers, and users by increasing collaboration and consensus toward a common agenda. 

Fact Sheet

Develop and Scale District Public-Private Partnerships that Sustain Reliable Rural Water Supply

This fact sheet highlights SWS’s work in Uganda, where Whave is working to cultivate a sustainable model for rural water service delivery by testing a preventive maintenance approach in three pilot districts. Operating as a Ugandan regional service provider, Whave is signing multi-year preventive maintenance service agreements with communities that require community leaders to charge operation and maintenance tariffs, manage the collected funds in supervised bank accounts, and pay an annual service fee.

Webinar

Webinar: Using Network Analysis to Understand and Strengthen WASH Systems

On February 21, 2018, the Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership (SWS) conducted a webinar that provides an introduction to network analysis and early lessons learned from analyses conducted in Ethiopia, Uganda, and Cambodia. SWS is using such analyses to better understand the complex interactions and interdependencies of actors in a local WASH system, with the ultimate goal of increasing the sustainability of WASH services.

Fact Sheet

Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership Fact Sheet

Sustainable services remain a daunting challenge in the water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) sector. Traditionally, national and local governments, WASH service providers, and development partners have focused on the construction of WASH facilities and the expansion of service coverage. Less emphasis has been placed on sustaining and maintaining existing WASH services. As a result, failure rates of water supply and sanitation systems continue to be high.