Resilience

Field Guide

Natural and Nature-Based Flood Management: A Green Guide

World Wildlife Fund (WWF), in partnership with the US Agency for International Development Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA), developed this guide (the "Flood Green Guide") to support communities at a local level in using natural and nature-based methods for flood risk management. An interdisciplinary global team developed the Flood Green Guide with a specific focus on advancing the development and application of natural and nature-based methods for managing flood risk.

Fact Sheet

Fact Sheet: PREPARED Program (East Africa)

The livelihoods of East Africans largely depend on access to and protection of their natural resources, including wildlife. When those resources are threatened, poverty grows. Rising temperatures, fluctuating rainy seasons and extreme weather events affect many in the region, especially those engaged in agriculture, fishing and pastoralism. These factors diminish incomes and impair access to food, health care, electricity, safe drinking water and sanitation services – undermining and potentially reversing development progress.

Article

The Infrastructure Upgrade, Reimagined

In Peru, a new cross-sector initiative supported by USAID and the Government of Canada is moving beyond concrete-and-steel projects to an expansive new vision of 21st-century water infrastructure that includes natural ecosystems, ancestral approaches, and people themselves.

Read the full article in Global Waters on Medium.

 

Article

Keeping the Water Flowing in Nepal

When the citizens of Lapilang, a village in the northeastern region of Nepal, needed fresh drinking water, they would collect their buckets and set out on an hours long journey up a steep mountainside overlooking the foothills of the Himalayas.

Document

Private Sector Engagement in the Water Security Improvement Process

Improving the sustainability of a watershed requires active engagement with all major water users — particularly private sector actors, which can be large, impactful and politically influential water users. However, engaging the private sector in broader water security efforts requires understanding their motivations and drivers, including their water risks and business opportunities.

Webinar

How to Improve Water Security

The Sustainable Water Partnership’s Water Security Improvement (WSI) process helps stakeholders address water-related risks in a specific geographic area. This free webinar focuses on WSI processes and creating participatory, holistic approaches to water security management. Watch below to join Winrock International’s Eric Viala, SWP Director, and Tetra Tech’s John Parker, Deputy Director, to learn more about the WSI process.

Webinar

Watershed Moments in the Mara

New Beginnings in Transboundary Water Cooperation

Winding for nearly 14,000 kilometers, the Mara River is a vital source of life in Kenya and Tanzania. The river traverses the towering Mau Forest, wanders through tea plantations and growing settlements in the upper Basin, and waters the rangelands of Maasai pastoral communities. The river also sustains the region’s stunning biodiversity, from forest ecosystems to the wildebeests migrating between Serengeti National Park and Maasai Mara National Reserve.

Blog

What is the Water Security Improvement Process?

Improving water security means empowering everyone — water managers and users, businesses, and citizens — to regularly assess and address water risks. By collaborating with communities, we can negotiate project activities which will best reduce negative effects of a particular area’s primary water risks. The Sustainable Water Partnership’s Water Security Improvement (WSI) process relies heavily on changing behaviors away from polluting, wasteful practices and conventional engineering approaches that often prevail in many countries. It builds on eight essential practices:

Blog

What is Water Security?

Water fuels every aspect of life. It’s essential for basic health and hygiene, and it drives society’s most essential industries: agriculture, energy and transportation. Without water security there can be no national security. In fact, water is essential to the stability of every country on the planet. Understanding water security means looking beyond immediate supply to political, economic, social and environmental impacts.