Governance

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Lessons Learned from the 10-Year Rotary–USAID Partnership

Since 2009, a partnership between the Rotary and USAID has combined the local community leadership of Rotarian volunteers with the Agency’s technical expertise. Throughout, the focus of the program has been on accomplishing three goals: improving sanitation and hygiene in schools and health facilities; increasing community access to safe drinking water; and advocating for ample government financing of WASH—that is, water, sanitation, and hygiene.

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2019: The Year in Review

USAID is working to improve the lives of millions of people around the globe by addressing the most basic of human needs—access to water and sanitation.

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WASH Research Questions Worksheet

This worksheet features a series of questions designed to guide strategic thinking and programming decisions related to the following components of the water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) sectors:

  • Governance & Finance
  • Sanitation & Hygiene
  • Safe Drinking Water
  • Water Resources Management

Click here to download the worksheet. Please remember to share your input no later than Friday, November 29th.

Blog

Catalyzing Women’s Leadership to Advance WASH Adoption

In late August, the Women + Water Alliance came together at the Stockholm International Water Institute’s World Water Week to emphasize the important role women play in helping alleviate the global water crisis.  

Their session titled, “Catalyzing Women’s Leadership to Advance WASH Adoption” shared the context of how women as agents of change can help promote water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) in communities touched by the apparel industry. 

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Seeking Sustainability in Water Service Delivery in Haiti

In September, we had the opportunity to visit Jeremie, Haiti, to see the progress of USAID’s Water and Sanitation (WatSan) Project. The project works with municipal water utilities to build staff capacity, rehabilitate infrastructure, and improve operations. One of the main problems with Jeremie’s water system is the high rate of non-revenue water (NRW)—that is, water that enters the system but does not reach paying customers.