Kenya

Technical Brief

Sustaining Rural Water: A Comparative Study of Maintenance Models for Community-Managed Schemes

As rural water supply coverage rates rise across many countries, attention is increasingly being paid to finding and implementing cost-effective mechanisms to ensure this improved initial access is sustained over time. Conventional approaches to maintenance have largely been based on voluntary community-based management with communities taking on the burden of maintenance themselves, with limited, if any, support from external agencies or local government. Recently, there have been attempts to professionalize maintenance services and make these services affordable at the point of delivery.

Final Report

Water, Sanitation, and Education for Health (WASEH II) – Final Report

This report highlights all the aspects of programming of WASEH II project implemented in Kenya from 2004 to 2009 in six districts;: Rachuonyo, Homabay, Nyando, Suba, Migori and Bondo of Nyanza province in western Kenya.

WASEH II is a follow-on project of WASEH I, implemented from from1999 to 2003. 

 

WASEH in full means water, sanitation and education for health.

 

Summary

Mid-term Evaluation of the Kenya Integrated Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (KIWASH) Project: Summary of Findings and Recommendations

The Kenya Integrated Water, Sanitation and Hygiene program (KIWASH) is a $51 million 5-year project (October 2015 to September 2020) funded by USAID/Kenya and East Africa (USAID/KEA) and implemented by a consortium led by DAI. The goal of KIWASH is to improve lives and health through development and management of sustainable water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services in Kenya.

Brief

Kenya Integrated Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (KIWASH) Project Mid-Term Evaluation: Overview and Key Findings

USAID/Kenya and East Africa (USAID/KEA) launched the  Kenya Integrated Water Sanitation and Hygiene Program (KIWASH) project in October 2015, a $51 million five-year activity implemented by a consortium led by DAI. KIWASH was designed to institutionalize catalytic models of sustainable service delivery for accelerated expansion of water and sanitation services and to improve complementary hygiene behaviors.

Annual Report Story

Preparing East Africa for an Uncertain Future

Rising temperatures and an increase in extreme weather events in East Africa are impacting community livelihoods, the regional economy, and access to improved water and sanitation. Against this backdrop, USAID launched Planning for Resilience in East Africa through Policy, Adaptation, Research and Economic Development (PREPARED) in 2012, to help build the region’s capacity to plan and adapt to the impacts of a changing climate.

PhotoEssay

Kenya: Supporting Financing Initiatives for Water Utilities

The USAID Development Credit Authority published this photo essay on Exposure.co. It describes how public-private parternships have increased financing for water utilities in Kenya, and how technical assistance has been invested in improved infrastructure to increase access to water.

 

Project

Sustainable Water and Sanitation in Africa

The Sustainable Water and Sanitation in Africa (SUWASA) program was designed to improve access to safe, reliable, affordable, and sustainable water and sanitation services for unserved and underserved urban populations in sub-Sahara Africa. The program fostered urban water sector reforms to solve policy, institutional, regulatory, financial, and operational challenges that hindered the effective delivery of sustainable water and sanitation services for urban residents in nine African nations.

Final Report

Sustainable Water and Sanitation in Africa (SUWASA) – Final Report

The Sustainable Water and Sanitation in Africa (SUWASA) program was implemented from 2005–2009 to improve access to safe, reliable, affordable, and sustainable water and sanitation services for unserved and underserved urban populations in sub-Sahara Africa. The program fostered urban water sector reforms to solve policy, institutional, regulatory, financial, and operational challenges that hindered the effective delivery of sustainable water and sanitation services for urban residents in nine African nations.