open defecation

Water Currents

Water Currents: Focus on Swachh Bharat

Water Currents is produced biweekly by USAID’s E3 Water Office. Each issue contains recent news and articles on water sector issues, partner and donor updates, latest sector research, and a special focus on one topic. Please provide your feedback and suggestions by contacting the waterteam@usaid.gov.

Article

In Mali, Communities Take Health and Well-Being into their Own Hands

In the center of Simaye village in Mali’s Mopti Region, men, women, and children gather under a large tree to listen. Two USAID-trained facilitators discuss the health challenges facing the village. Only three latrines serve many families, so more than half of the people are practicing open defecation; the water point no longer functions, so most families are pulling dirty water from the river; many of the infants and young children are not benefitting from exclusive breastfeeding or a diversified diet, so they are malnourished.

Toolkit

CLTS Monitoring and Evaluation Toolkit & Manual

The CLTS process has reached a point in its implementation through SAREP that we are now able to introduce monitoring, evaluation (M&E) and ODF verification and Certification processes into the training. This toolkit and manual contains all forms and materials that are need for a CLTS monitoring team to be established in communities.

Activity

Nutrition and Hygiene Project

Sikasso Region is one of the most affected regions by malnutrition in Mali. According to the Standardized Monitoring and Assessment of Relief and Transitions Survey in 2016, 30.2 percent of children under 5 years of age are stunted. Causes of malnutrition in Sikasso are due to suboptimal nutrition and health behavior, limited access to high nutrient foods, and poor access to health, water and sanitation services.

 

Activity

Su-SWASTHA

Su-SWASTHA operates in the Mid-Western Region where socio-economic development lags far behind. In 2009, there was an extensive cholera epidemic in the Mid- and Far Western Regions which claimed the lives of more than 300 people and drew attention to the urgent need for improvements of WASH conditions. Despite the fact that young children are more susceptible to diarrheal disease caused by unclean water as well as poor sanitation and hygiene practices, school sanitation continues to be an underfunded sector in Nepal.

Activity

Safe Wash II

The project operates in Nepal’s Far-Western Region, where low access to water and sanitation facilities contributes to decreased socioeconomic development. In 2009, a cholera epidemic in the Farand Mid-Western regions claimed over 300 lives, spurring an increased focus on WASH in these areas. USAID/Nepal’s SAFE-WASH II project is designed to prevent such outbreaks and not only increase accessibility to water, sanitation, and hygiene facilities but to also ensure it reaches the most vulnerable communities.

Activity

Indonesian Forest and Climate Support Project

Indonesia is home to some of the world’s largest tropical rainforests and peatlands. Their stature is such that they are often referred to as the “lungs of the world.” These areas sustain rich biodiversity and are the habitat of many keystone species including the orangutan, the Sumatran tiger, and the clouded leopard, to name a few. Approximately 30 million culturally diverse people live in and around these forests. They are reliant on the forests both for their livelihood and for the ecosystem services they provide.

Article

Open Defecation vs. Community Toilets: A Complicated Choice

She told us all to just forget it. I didn’t catch her name, I just watched her adjust the microphone and stand on tiptoes at the podium. Her grey hair peeked out from behind and she sounded frustrated.

Forget the security. It won’t make a difference. Forget the caretakers and the cleaning supplies. We don’t need those. We just want sewer lines in our communities. That’s enough now. We want to use a toilet in our home.

Evaluation

High Five ("High 5") Programs Endline Survey

Diarrhea has been the main public health problem in Indonesia. The lastest Survey of Demography and Health in Indonesia (SDKI) indicates that 44 children in 1000 die before their fifth birthday in Indonesia and diarrhea is the main cause of death. Several studies (Fewtrell et al, 2005; Curtis, 2003) indicate that hygiene and sanitation practices are an important key to reducing the incidence of diarrhea. However, the hygiene and sanitation that is not practiced correctly or consistently within households in the community in general, hence endangering infants and children at risk .

Evaluation

High Five ("High 5") Programs Midline Household Survey

The Indonesian government launched the Community-Based Total Sanitation (CBTS) Program in 2007 to improve hygiene and sanitation practices in households, thereby reducing the incidence of diarrhea, the second leading cause of infant mortality. The program consists of five hygiene and sanitation pillars, namely: