climate adaptation

Field Guide

Natural and Nature-Based Flood Management: A Green Guide

World Wildlife Fund (WWF), in partnership with the US Agency for International Development Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA), developed this guide (the "Flood Green Guide") to support communities at a local level in using natural and nature-based methods for flood risk management. An interdisciplinary global team developed the Flood Green Guide with a specific focus on advancing the development and application of natural and nature-based methods for managing flood risk.

Fact Sheet

Fact Sheet: PREPARED Program (East Africa)

The livelihoods of East Africans largely depend on access to and protection of their natural resources, including wildlife. When those resources are threatened, poverty grows. Rising temperatures, fluctuating rainy seasons and extreme weather events affect many in the region, especially those engaged in agriculture, fishing and pastoralism. These factors diminish incomes and impair access to food, health care, electricity, safe drinking water and sanitation services – undermining and potentially reversing development progress.

Article

The Infrastructure Upgrade, Reimagined

In Peru, a new cross-sector initiative supported by USAID and the Government of Canada is moving beyond concrete-and-steel projects to an expansive new vision of 21st-century water infrastructure that includes natural ecosystems, ancestral approaches, and people themselves.

Read the full article in Global Waters on Medium.

 

Manual

Environmental Flows Technical Guidance Manual

This technical guidance manual was developed to assist Missions and partners in understanding the importance of environmental flow (E-flow) regimes and their benefits to water security and sustainable development outcomes. Recognizing that there is a vast body of literature exploring the environmental dimensions and practical assessments of E-flows, we explore and emphasize the broader community and societal benefits of E-flow regimes.

Webinar

Watershed Moments in the Mara

New Beginnings in Transboundary Water Cooperation

Winding for nearly 14,000 kilometers, the Mara River is a vital source of life in Kenya and Tanzania. The river traverses the towering Mau Forest, wanders through tea plantations and growing settlements in the upper Basin, and waters the rangelands of Maasai pastoral communities. The river also sustains the region’s stunning biodiversity, from forest ecosystems to the wildebeests migrating between Serengeti National Park and Maasai Mara National Reserve.