Governance

Final Report

Philippine Water Revolving Fund (PWRF) Follow-On Program – Final Report

The Philippine Water Revolving Fund (PWRF) was an innovative lending program that leveraged public funds with private financing for water and sanitation projects. USAID brought to bear its technical assistance to design, assess feasibility of and structure the Fund; build capability among market players; and provide marketing and institutional support at operational stage. It also provided credit enhancements to private investors.

PhotoEssay

Photo Essay: World Water Day 2019: Leaving No One Behind

Clean water and safe sanitation are key stepping stones on the journey to self-reliance. Throughout the year and around the globe, USAID partners with households, civic leaders, businesses, and governments to improve water and sanitation access for entire communities — laying the foundation for a healthier and more water-secure future. On March 22, travel around the world in celebration of World Water Day in this photo essay and see how USAID harnesses the transformative power of clean water to change lives, revitalize neighborhoods, and make sure no one is left behind.

Article

Applying the “Internet of Things” to Water Systems

In many respects, Ethiopia’s lowlands represent the final frontier for the country’s ambitious plans to improve WASH coverage through its One WASH National Program. These harsh, arid lands are home to predominantly pastoral communities that roam with their livestock in search of water and grazing lands. Adding to these challenges are the pressures of regular droughts, depleted groundwater tables, and a lack of institutional capacity on the human and data side.

Article

Building Local Capacity to Protect and Manage Water Resources in Tanzania

Around the world, competition for water resources is growing. Population growth and shifting rainfall patterns mean far more demand for increasingly unreliable sources. Meanwhile, too many well-intentioned water supply systems sit unused because communities are not prepared to manage or maintain them. Even those water schemes that remain functional struggle to equitably allocate water resources, and many small-scale users who live far from water sources have been left out.

LiteratureReview

Financing Facility Landscape Assessment Report | WASH-FIN Working Paper No. 1

Achieving the goal of universal access to water and sanitation demands monumental and unprecedented mobilization of resources. Government resources, donor contributions, and international financial institution funds in the form of grants and concessional loans are scarce, resulting in a significant financing gap. Financing gap projections sit at over $100 billion per year for capital investment required to meet the target.

Article

Developing Groundwater Maps for Arid Regions of Kenya and Ethiopia

With funding provided by USAID, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and its partners are combining geospatial data from remote sensing with traditional hydrogeological methods to map groundwater resources in two study areas in Kenya and Ethiopia. The primary goals of the project are to locate and quantify the groundwater aquifers in order to support sustainable management of the resource and generate higher success rate when drilling water supply wells, as well training local water resources agency staff and others on the methodology used to develop the maps.

Article

Enhancing Media Coverage of Water Issues in Africa and the Middle East

With funding from the U.S. Department of State, the U.S. Agency for Global Media (USAGM) has trained nearly 30 journalists from the Nile Basin and across the Middle East on a variety of water issues. The trainings built capacity among journalists who often do not have the resources to focus on a single topical issue, such as water. This project represented whole-of-government thinking resulting in an U.S. government interagency project that impacts millions of people by bringing them reliable news and information about water issues. 

Article

Community-Based Efforts to Contain Trash and Protect Waterways

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has worked with Panama, Jamaica, and Peru, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of State and Peace Corps, to reduce their land-based sources of trash pollution in waterways. EPA’s Trash Free Waters (TFW) approach is a stakeholder-based strategy to reduce land-based sources of marine litter through better management of trash pollution in inland waterways and coastal waters. These practices focus on community-based efforts that prevent and reduce trash in waterways and, ultimately, the oceans.