Water Security

Final Report

Transboundary Water for Biodiversity and Human Health in the Mara River Basin – Project Summary

The Transboundary Water for Biodiversity and Human Health in the Mara River Basin (TWB-MRB) Project was been a collaborative effort under the Global Water for Sustainability (GLOWS) Program with participation from CARE Tanzania, the Mara River Waters Users Association (MRWUA), Florida International University (FIU), World Wildlife Fund Eastern and South Africa Regional Programme Office (WWF-ESARPO) and World Vision Kenya.

Final Report

Water Security for Resilient Economic Growth and Stability (Be Secure): Final Report – Province of Basilan

USAID’s Water Security for Resilient Economic Growth and Stability (Be Secure) Project in the Philippines, awarded in July 2013, was a four-year activity that worked to promote good governance and build capacity for long-term water security, improve access to water and wastewater treatment services, and build more resilient communities. Be Secure focused on achieving two intermediate results:

Report

What Does Climate Change Mean for the Limpopo Basin?

The objective of the Resilience in the Limpopo Basin Program (RESILIM) of USAID Southern Africa is to enhance the resilience of people and ecosystems in the Limpopo Basin Program (LRB) by strengthening the capacity of the Limpopo Watercourse Commission (LIMCOM), and its key stakeholders, to address issues of climate change adaptation and biodiversity conservation within the context of trans-boundary integrated water resources management (IWRM).

Report

Water Under Fire | For Every Child, Water, and Sanitation in Complex Emergencies

In times of crisis, children face many dangers: They are forced from home, separated from family, deprived of food, barred from school, and exposed to exploitation and violence. In crises involving armed conflict, children are threatened by injury and death. But bullets and bombs are not always the deadliest threats to a child’s life. In protracted conflicts, children younger than 15 are, on average, nearly three times more likely to die from diarrheal disease linked to unsafe water and sanitation than violence directly linked to conflict and war.

Video

Water, Conflict, and Peacebuilding

Water is essential to the health of individuals, the vitality of communities, and the stability of nations. This animated short from the Wilson Center and USAID’s Office of Conflict Management and Mitigation celebrates how working together to ensure safe and sufficient water supplies not only increases the resilience of communities, but also helps build peace in war-torn nations.

Panel Discussion

Feeding a Thirsty World: Harnessing the Connections Between Food and Water Security (Live Stream)

Food and water security are deeply entwined. Seventy percent of global water use is for agriculture while more than 25 percent of the global population lives in areas facing severe water scarcity and more than 820 million people face chronic food deprivation. As the global population continues to rise and changing weather and climate patterns disrupts food and water availability, we need innovative and forward-looking approaches to securing food and water for vulnerable populations.

Event

Panel Discussion – Feeding a Thirsty World: Harnessing the Connections Between Food and Water Security

Seventy percent of global water use is for agriculture, while more than 25 percent of the global population lives in areas facing severe water scarcity and more than 820 million people face chronic food deprivation. A rising global population and changing weather and climate patterns disrupts food and water availability, requiring innovative and forward-looking approaches to securing food and water for vulnerable populations.

Article

Developing Groundwater Maps for Arid Regions of Kenya and Ethiopia

With funding provided by USAID, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and its partners are combining geospatial data from remote sensing with traditional hydrogeological methods to map groundwater resources in two study areas in Kenya and Ethiopia. The primary goals of the project are to locate and quantify the groundwater aquifers in order to support sustainable management of the resource and generate higher success rate when drilling water supply wells, as well training local water resources agency staff and others on the methodology used to develop the maps.

Article

Tanzania Balances Competing Demands for Scarce Water Resources

The Tanzanian community of Loibor Siret is a village of approximately 5,000 people (predominantly ethnic Maasai) and 15,000 head of livestock --- a number that rises and falls with the seasons. Here, the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) works alongside Tanzania People & Wildlife (TPW) and community representatives to improve water management in this semi-arid landscape.