Resilience

Blog

Water Reuse Gets a New Take in South Africa

Water reuse can be an effective way to supplement the water needs of growing cities. Even in the midst of record breaking droughts, this alternative can have meaningful impact once it overcomes public misperceptions and investment barriers. USAID and its partners are helping South Africa encourage greater understanding of this promising approach for strengthening urban water security in the face of growing water scarcity.

Blog

Check Out USAID at World Water Week 2018

World Water Week starts in Stockholm, Sweden, on August 26. The annual gathering organized by the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) has become a focal point for the globe’s water issues. Last year’s event attracted more than 3,300 individuals and some 380 convening organizations from 135 countries.

Blog

Hope is Not a Strategy

“Water variability has always existed,” said USAID Climate Change Adaptation Specialist Jonathan Cook, opening the fourth and final “Sustainable Water, Resilient Communities” event. At the event on May 30, co-hosted by the USAID-funded Sustainable Water Partnership (SWP) and the Wilson Center, panelists came together to discuss challenges of water variability–challenges which are, at first glance, staggering.

Project

Construction & Rehabilitation of Small Water Supply Systems

To respond to the El Niño drought crisis in Mozambique, and support the goals of the PEPFAR program, USAID/Mozambique is funding the expansion of drought and flood resilient water supply systems to communities and health facilities in 14 heavily drought affected districts across five provinces, focusing on districts with high HIV prevalence.

Note: Funding level includes $250,000 for oversight.

Document

Project Profile: Emergency WASH Response in Africa

WASH Response Helps Stabilize Regions in Africa

Emergency WASH Response in Africa with the Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance | 2014–2019

In times of crisis, whether natural or conflict-induced, affected communities are more susceptible to illness and death from waterborne diseases, such as diarrhea and cholera, caused by a lack of safe drinking water, inadequate sanitation, and poor hygiene.