gender

Article

Where WASH Saves Lives: Creating New Traditions in Nepal

On her first night of menstruation, and for every night of her period, 15-year-old Roshani Tiruwa was expected to leave the warmth and safety of her family home and sleep in a tiny windowless hut barely large enough to stretch out in. She ate less dinner than usual because, by custom, women are not allowed to eat dairy at this point in their cycle.

Water Currents

Water Currents: Celebrating Menstrual Hygiene Day

Water Currents is produced biweekly by USAID’s E3 Water Office. Each issue contains recent news and articles on water sector issues, partner and donor updates, latest sector research, and a special focus on one topic. Please provide your feedback and suggestions by contacting the waterteam@usaid.gov.

Global Waters Article

Tackling Water Issues Lightens the Load for Garment Workers

The apparel industry employs millions of people throughout the world, a majority of whom are women. In many garment-producing countries women also bear the disproportionate burden for household responsibilities, particularly water collection.

Lack of access to safe drinking water and sanitation takes up their time, affects their health, lowers their income-earning potential, and stands in the way of caring for families and improving their education.

Website

U.S.-Pakistan Center for Advanced Studies in Water

The United States Government through United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and Government of Pakistan through the Higher Education Commission (HEC) have partnered together to create state of art centers for advanced studies.

Fact Sheet

Women + Water Fact Sheet

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and Gap Inc. share a common interest in improving the health and well-being of the women, families, and communities touched by the global apparel industry through improved water, sanitation, and hygiene services, and responsibly managing water resources.

Activity

Wellness and Agriculture for Life Advancement PL480 Project

Catholic Relief Services (CRS) Malawi began implementation of the Wellness and Agriculture for Life Advancement (WALA) program in July 2009, with an ending date of June 2014. This five-year USAID-funded PL480 Title II program is through Food for Peace (FFP) and implemented in the eight most food insecure districts in the south of Malawi. WALA is implemented by a consortium of nine Private Voluntary Organizations (PVOs) led by CRS Malawi as the grant holder.

Activity

Empowering Girls Through Education and Health

Empowering Girls Through Education and Health (ASPIRE) is a four-year US$ 18.2 million USAID activity aimed at increasing the educational attainment of girls in primary and secondary schools in Balaka, Machinga and Zomba districts in Malawi, reaching 182,000 girls.

Activity

Pathways to Sustainable Food Security

Since 2014, PCI has led the Njira project, a $30 million USAID-funded initiative to address the underlying causes of food security in the Balaka and Machinga districts of Malawi. In 2016, Njira reached over 107,000 individuals through a tailored approach that improves agriculture, agribusiness, health, nutrition and disaster preparedness within vulnerable communities. Community Complementary Feeding and Learning Sessions (CCFLS) are one of Njira’s hallmark approaches to improving the health of children under five years of age.

Activity

Tajikistan Maternal and Child Health Project

USAID’s program focused on birth preparedness and maternity services, newborn care and treatment, treatment of child illnesses, health systems strengthening, and household water, sanitation, and hygiene improvement. As new programs are currently being designed and procured, population coverage is still being determined. Nutrition has been addressed in the past through Title 2 programs, which are now ending.

Activity

Feed the Future Tajikistan Health and Nutrition Activity

Located in Central Asia, Tajikistan is a post-conflict, post-Soviet country with significant food security needs: 10.4 percent of the population in the Feed the Future target region lives on less than $1.25 a day, and many women and children are undernourished.