gender

Blog

The Ripple Effect: Supporting Women’s Empowerment through Water

New research demonstrates that improving a woman’s access to water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) provides a multitude of indirect and positive impacts that often are overlooked in traditional development interventions. Benefits of this water access “ripple effect” go beyond the time savings and health outcomes that are well known across the sector. Referred to as “pathways to empowerment,” these now-quantifiable impacts cover a range of outcomes, including a more than 50 percent increase in female community leadership positions and shifts in gender norms within the community.

Blog

Key Takeaways from Stockholm World Water Week 2018

More than 3,000 practitioners and decision-makers gathered in Stockholm, Sweden, at the end of August 2018 for World Water Week. Hosted by the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI), this annual gathering encourages new thinking and positive action on water-related opportunities and challenges. 

Fact Sheet

The Women & Water Ripple Effect Study -- Fact Sheet

There is a global connection between women and water. Yet little research exists that fully explores the impact of women’s access to safe water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) — especially through the lens of economic development. In 2018, the Water and Development Alliance (WADA) partnered with Ipsos to develop a framework for understanding the many  ways improved access to WASH can impact women, their families, and communities. Pathways to Empowerment — deemed “Ripple Effects” — were identified, which capture the various ways access to water impacts women across the developing world.

Brochure

The Women & Water Ripple Effect -- Brochure

Providing insights into the ways access to water can empower women In 2018, the Water and Development Alliance (WADA) partnered with the global research experts at Ipsos to advance the understanding of the intersection between water access and women’s empowerment. This research informed a framework for capturing the many ways improved access to water can impact women, their families, and communities.

Event

Check Out USAID at World Water Week 2018

World Water Week starts in Stockholm, Sweden, on August 26. The annual gathering organized by the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) has become a focal point for the globe’s water issues. Last year’s event attracted more than 3,300 individuals and some 380 convening organizations from 135 countries.

Experts, practitioners, decision-makers, business innovators, and young professionals from a range of sectors and countries come to Stockholm with a focus on the 2018 theme, “Water, ecosystems and human development.”