food security

Regional Mission Overview

Sahel Regional

Context

West Africa’s Sahel is an arid band stretching 1.1 million square miles.  Made up of four countries—Burkina Faso, Chad, Mauritania, and Niger—this zone’s mix of deeply rooted chronic poverty, food insecurity, limited rainfall, and recurrent drought drive the same vulnerable communities into crisis year after year.

Panel Discussion

Feeding a Thirsty World: Harnessing the Connections Between Food and Water Security – Panel Discussion (Live Stream)

Food and water security are deeply entwined. Seventy percent of global water use is for agriculture while more than 25 percent of the global population lives in areas facing severe water scarcity and more than 820 million people face chronic food deprivation. As the global population continues to rise and changing weather and climate patterns disrupts food and water availability, we need innovative and forward-looking approaches to securing food and water for vulnerable populations.

Article

Degradation of Kenya’s Water Towers Contribute to Growing Water Crisis

Kenya’s five major forest “water towers”—Mau Forest Complex, Mt. Kenya, Aberdares, Cherangany Hills, and Mt. Elgon—provide an estimated 75 percent of the country’s water resources and are central to Kenya’s economic and social well-being. Water towers are forested, high elevation landscapes from which most of the country’s major rivers (e.g., Tana, Mara, and Ewaso Ng’iro) originate.

Event

Panel Discussion – Feeding a Thirsty World: Harnessing the Connections Between Food and Water Security

Seventy percent of global water use is for agriculture, while more than 25 percent of the global population lives in areas facing severe water scarcity and more than 820 million people face chronic food deprivation. A rising global population and changing weather and climate patterns disrupts food and water availability, requiring innovative and forward-looking approaches to securing food and water for vulnerable populations.

Article

Tanzania Balances Competing Demands for Scarce Water Resources

The Tanzanian community of Loibor Siret is a village of approximately 5,000 people (predominantly ethnic Maasai) and 15,000 head of livestock --- a number that rises and falls with the seasons. Here, the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) works alongside Tanzania People & Wildlife (TPW) and community representatives to improve water management in this semi-arid landscape.

Article

Engaging Communities Through Landscape-Level Water Conservation in Jordan

By 2025, water demand in Jordan will exceed available resources by 26 percent. Shortages are due to rapid internal population growth, an influx of refugees, natural resource extraction, climate change, and excessive groundwater use that is twice the recharge rate. Renewable water supply currently only meets half of total water consumption in the Jordan. Although more than 90 percent of rainfall currently evaporates or runs off, and U.S.

Article

Securing Water for Food – Global Waters In Focus

This Global Waters In Focus looks at the Securing Water for Food (SWFF) Grand Challenge for Development. Since 2013, USAID has partnered with the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida), the South Africa Department of Science and Technology, and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Kingdom of the Netherlands to develop science and technology solutions that allow farmers to produce more food with less water through the SWFF Grand Challenge for Development.

Evaluation

Final Performance Evaluation of Securing Water for Food Grand Challenge for Development

The goal of Securing Water for Food (SWFF) was an innovation and acceleration initiative meant to source, incubate and accelerate high-potential technical solutions and/or business models that find new and sustain existing water supplies as well as lower overall water demands in the food value chain to reduce water scarcity and poverty.

Evaluation

Impact of Water Users Associations on Water and Land Productivity, Equity and Food Security in Tajikistan: Final Report Volume I

This report provides a summary and synthesis of a series of impact evaluation findings undertaken from 2014 to 2018 by the International Water Management Institute (IWMI). A key focus of this evaluation is to assess the impact that these WUAs have had on the management and productivity of irrigation water and land resources, as well as on equity and food security in Tajikistan.