water security

Panel Discussion

Water @ Wilson: 50 Years of Water, Conflict, and Cooperation

On the occasion of the Wilson Center's 50th anniversary, its Environmental Change and Security Program and nine co-sponsoring programs convened experts on November 28 from government, the NGO sector, and academia for a comprehensive look at the first year of the U.S. Government Global Water Strategy and new research and practice on water, peace, and conflict.

Final Report

Water Security for Resilient Economic Growth and Stability (Be Secure): Final Report – Province of Basilan

USAID’s Water Security for Resilient Economic Growth and Stability (Be Secure) Project in the Philippines, awarded in July 2013, was a four-year activity that worked to promote good governance and build capacity for long-term water security, improve access to water and wastewater treatment services, and build more resilient communities. Be Secure focused on achieving two intermediate results:

Report

What Does Climate Change Mean for the Limpopo Basin?

The objective of the Resilience in the Limpopo Basin Program (RESILIM) of USAID Southern Africa is to enhance the resilience of people and ecosystems in the Limpopo Basin Program (LRB) by strengthening the capacity of the Limpopo Watercourse Commission (LIMCOM), and its key stakeholders, to address issues of climate change adaptation and biodiversity conservation within the context of trans-boundary integrated water resources management (IWRM).

Video

Water, Conflict, and Peacebuilding

Water is essential to the health of individuals, the vitality of communities, and the stability of nations. This animated short from the Wilson Center and USAID’s Office of Conflict Management and Mitigation celebrates how working together to ensure safe and sufficient water supplies not only increases the resilience of communities, but also helps build peace in war-torn nations.

Panel Discussion

Feeding a Thirsty World: Harnessing the Connections Between Food and Water Security – Panel Discussion (Live Stream)

Food and water security are deeply entwined. Seventy percent of global water use is for agriculture while more than 25 percent of the global population lives in areas facing severe water scarcity and more than 820 million people face chronic food deprivation. As the global population continues to rise and changing weather and climate patterns disrupts food and water availability, we need innovative and forward-looking approaches to securing food and water for vulnerable populations.

Conference

2019 UNC Water and Health Conference: Where Science Meets Policy

The 2019 Water and Health Conference: Where Science Meets Policy, organized by the Water Institute at UNC explores drinking water supply, sanitation, hygiene and water resources in both the developing and developed worlds with a strong public health emphasis.

Event

Panel Discussion – Feeding a Thirsty World: Harnessing the Connections Between Food and Water Security

Seventy percent of global water use is for agriculture, while more than 25 percent of the global population lives in areas facing severe water scarcity and more than 820 million people face chronic food deprivation. A rising global population and changing weather and climate patterns disrupts food and water availability, requiring innovative and forward-looking approaches to securing food and water for vulnerable populations.

PhotoEssay

Photo Essay: World Water Day 2019: Leaving No One Behind

Clean water and safe sanitation are key stepping stones on the journey to self-reliance. Throughout the year and around the globe, USAID partners with households, civic leaders, businesses, and governments to improve water and sanitation access for entire communities — laying the foundation for a healthier and more water-secure future. On March 22, travel around the world in celebration of World Water Day in this photo essay and see how USAID harnesses the transformative power of clean water to change lives, revitalize neighborhoods, and make sure no one is left behind.

Article

Applying the “Internet of Things” to Water Systems

In many respects, Ethiopia’s lowlands represent the final frontier for the country’s ambitious plans to improve WASH coverage through its One WASH National Program. These harsh, arid lands are home to predominantly pastoral communities that roam with their livestock in search of water and grazing lands. Adding to these challenges are the pressures of regular droughts, depleted groundwater tables, and a lack of institutional capacity on the human and data side.