WASHPaLS’ Webinar Presents Key Findings from CLTS Research

In what has been termed a revolution of sorts, community-led total sanitation (CLTS) introduced a new approach to eliminating open defecation when it was pioneered by Kamal Kar 17 years ago. Since its introduction, approximately 60 countries have adopted CLTS, a technique which triggers communal disgust to change defecation behaviors and expand sanitation coverage in mostly rural communities. A good number of governments have even embraced CLTS as their national policy.

WASHPaLS Global Call for Data and Research Collaboration

Community-led Total Sanitation (CLTS) represents a revolution in the fight to end open defecation, with large-scale programs in place and embedded in national policy in dozens of countries. In their Handbook on Community-Led Total Sanitation, Kar and Chambers (2008) identified an array of variables thought to make program success more or less likely.

Water Currents: Global Handwashing Day 2017

Global Handwashing Day is celebrated each year on October 15 to increase awareness and understanding around the importance of handwashing with soap as an easy, effective, and affordable way to prevent diseases and save lives. USAID recognizes washing hands with soap at critical times as a vital step in curbing the spread of diarrhea and respiratory illness, and promoting healthy growth.

Handwashing with Soap, Where Are We?

Global Handwashing Day (October 15) was established in 2008 as a platform to advocate for greater attention to hand hygiene. This effort, combined with many other efforts to bring attention to the need for improved water supply, sanitation, and hygiene, have resulted in the inclusion of handwashing as an indicator within the Sustainable Development Goals (6.2.1 Population with a basic handwashing facility with soap and water available on premise). With this, more countries than ever before have begun to include handwashing with soap as an indicator in their routine data collection.

Norms, Nudges, or Addiction: Understanding Drivers for Handwashing Behavior

On September 12th, the Global Handwashing Partnership (GHP) and USAID hosted a webinar on behavior change strategies for handwashing with soap.

In this webinar, Nga Nguyen with USAID, Dr. Reshmaan Hussam, Assistant Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School, and Dr. Hans Mosler of the University of Zurich and EAWAG, presented updates on recent research and key implications of two frameworks for handwashing behavior change. The presenters also answered questions on how to apply these approaches and share new learning and advocacy resources.

WASHPaLs: Providing Convenient Access to Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Expertise

The Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Partnerships and Learning for Sustainability (WASHPaLS) project is a five-year (2016–2021) Task Order working to improve water supply, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) programming by identifying, sharing, and guiding the use of best practices for the delivery of WASH services and sustained behavior change. Through operational research, small grants, and technical assistance, the project works with USAID, governments, key sector donors and implementers to fill evidence gaps related to rural sanitation and behavior change.

A Clean Break, a Fresh Start

Learn how students, teachers, and USAID are teaming up for better health in East Java, Indonesia.

A Troublesome Toilet

At Ngalah School in Pasuruan, Indonesia, over 330 girls had to share Dorm D’s solitary bathroom—more like a locker room or public pool facility than anything else.

"It was dirty. Bugs were everywhere,” said 19-year-old Anis Faridah, the girls’ student leader. “There weren’t enough toilets or enough showers."

Water Currents: Handwashing Research

Highlighting the most recent handwashing research, this issue of Currents includes literature reviews by the Global Handwashing Partnership, the International Initiative for Impact Evaluation, and an interesting report on handwashing and rational addiction. Articles discuss handwashing research in Bangladesh, Tanzania, and Zimbabwe as well as studies on handwashing and infectious diseases, among other topics.