food hygiene

Document

Project Profile: Mali Nutrition and Hygiene

Mali: A Ground Game to Tackle Malnutrition

Nutrition and Hygiene Project | 2013–2018

Some 15 districts and four regions of Mali—Mopti, Segou, Koulikoro, and Sikasso— are heavily affected by WASH-related malnutrition, poor access to health care, and substandard water and sanitation services.

Blog

Webinar Addresses Underemphasized Health Risks Children Face in Their Home Environments

For decades, implementers have applied water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) and nutrition-based interventions—alone and in a variety of combinations—to address diarrheal disease and stunting among infants and young children (IYC) in low- and middle-income countries. Given the extensive and intensive efforts, why aren’t we seeing more progress?

Event

Webinar Announcement: Toward a Hygienic Environment for Infants and Young Children

USAID is holding a webinar to discuss findings from the recent report, Toward a Hygienic Environment for Infants and Young Children: A Review of the Literature.

USAID recently completed this review of the scientific and grey literature to capture the state of knowledge of the health risks to infants and young children from fecal exposure in their home environments, focusing on historically underemphasized sources and transmission pathways not disrupted by the traditional suite of WASH measures.

Report

Toward a Hygienic Environment for Infants and Young Children: A Review of the Literature

The USAID Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Partnerships and Learning for Sustainability (WASHPaLS) project conducted a review of the scientific and grey literature, complemented by dozens of key informant interviews with researchers and field implementers, to synthesize the latest understanding of key pathways of fecal microbe ingestion by infants and young children (IYC) and their links to diarrhea, EED, and poor nutrition and development outcomes.

Specifically, the review sought to:

Evaluation

High Five ("High 5") Programs Endline Survey

Diarrhea has been the main public health problem in Indonesia. The lastest Survey of Demography and Health in Indonesia (SDKI) indicates that 44 children in 1000 die before their fifth birthday in Indonesia and diarrhea is the main cause of death. Several studies (Fewtrell et al, 2005; Curtis, 2003) indicate that hygiene and sanitation practices are an important key to reducing the incidence of diarrhea. However, the hygiene and sanitation that is not practiced correctly or consistently within households in the community in general, hence endangering infants and children at risk .

Evaluation

High Five ("High 5") Programs Midline Household Survey

The Indonesian government launched the Community-Based Total Sanitation (CBTS) Program in 2007 to improve hygiene and sanitation practices in households, thereby reducing the incidence of diarrhea, the second leading cause of infant mortality. The program consists of five hygiene and sanitation pillars, namely:

Webinar

Handwashing and Global Food Hygiene

Food hygiene is a particularly relevant topic for those who work in handwashing. This webinar, hosted as part of World Health Day 2015 celebrations, explores why food hygiene matters for child health in a global context.