Mozambique

Project

Sustainable Water and Sanitation in Africa

The Sustainable Water and Sanitation in Africa (SUWASA) program was designed to improve access to safe, reliable, affordable, and sustainable water and sanitation services for unserved and underserved urban populations in sub-Sahara Africa. The program fostered urban water sector reforms to solve policy, institutional, regulatory, financial, and operational challenges that hindered the effective delivery of sustainable water and sanitation services for urban residents in nine African nations.

Final Report

Sustainable Water and Sanitation in Africa (SUWASA) – Final Report

The Sustainable Water and Sanitation in Africa (SUWASA) program was implemented from 2005–2009 to improve access to safe, reliable, affordable, and sustainable water and sanitation services for unserved and underserved urban populations in sub-Sahara Africa. The program fostered urban water sector reforms to solve policy, institutional, regulatory, financial, and operational challenges that hindered the effective delivery of sustainable water and sanitation services for urban residents in nine African nations.

Activity

Resilience in the Limpopo Basin Program

From June 2012 to December 2017, the USAID-funded Resilience in the Limpopo Basin Program (RESILIM) contributed to significant advances in water management, biodiversity, and climate change adaptation across an area of Southern Africa as large as Sweden that is home to 18 million people.

Report

What Does Climate Change Mean for the Limpopo Basin?

The objective of the Resilience in the Limpopo Basin Program (RESILIM) of USAID Southern Africa is to enhance the resilience of people and ecosystems in the Limpopo Basin Program (LRB) by strengthening the capacity of the Limpopo Watercourse Commission (LIMCOM), and its key stakeholders, to address issues of climate change adaptation and biodiversity conservation within the context of trans-boundary integrated water resources management (IWRM).

Report

Determining the Effectiveness and Mode of Operation of Community-Led Total Sanitation: The DEMO-CLTS study

Globally, 2.3 billion people lack access to safe sanitation services and 892 million people practice open defecation, which poses a dramatic threat to public health. Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) aims at eliminating open defecation by applying participatory activities that engage entire communities. CLTS has shown to be successful in eradicating open defecation, however, results remain diverse and in-depth understanding of CLTS’ mechanisms is still lacking. This study from RanasMosler tries to close this research gap.

Project

Maternal and Child Survival Program - Mozambique

The USAID Bureau for Global Health’s flagship Maternal and Child Survival Program (MCSP) focuses on 27 high-priority countries with the ultimate goal of preventing child and maternal deaths. The Program is introducing and supporting high-impact, sustainable reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health (RMNCH) interventions in partnership with ministries of health and other partners.

Project

Nikhalamo

NIKHALAMO is a word in the local language (Chuabo) and means, freely translated, “Girl Child, Stay in School”. The objective of the 4-year (2015-2018) NIKHALAMO Project is to ensure that vulnerable girls in Namacurra district (Zambezia Province) complete upper primary school and transit to lower secondary schools (6th and 7th grades). The project is implemented by ADPP Mozambique (Development Aid from People to People).

Project

Construction & Rehabilitation of Small Water Supply Systems

To respond to the El Niño drought crisis in Mozambique, and support the goals of the PEPFAR program, USAID/Mozambique is funding the expansion of drought and flood resilient water supply systems to communities and health facilities in 14 heavily drought affected districts across five provinces, focusing on districts with high HIV prevalence.

Note: Funding level includes $250,000 for oversight.