water resources management

Central Program

Sustainable Water Partnership

The Sustainable Water Partnership (SWP) is a five-year, Leader with Associates cooperative agreement that supports U.S. Agency for International Development’s (USAID) thought leadership, innovation and action in global water security by integrating water security issues into Mission programming through relevant, Mission-specific initiatives. Together with its partners Tetra Tech, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), World Resources Institute (WRI), Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) and its resource partners CEO Water Mandate and mWater, and Winrock International will develop comprehensive water security intervention strategies using locally owned solutions at the water basin, sub-basin and local catchment scales.
Project

Jordan Water Management Initiative

The USAID/Jordan Water Management Initiative (WMI) (2016-2021) supports the Government of Jordan to address its most pressing water and wastewater management needs while improving sector policy and performance and increasing local capacity. WMI works with the Ministry of Water and Irrigation, the Water Authority of Jordan (WAJ), the Jordan Valley Authority (JVA), all of Jordan’s largest water and sanitation utilities, water user associations, and civil society.

Evaluation

Final Performance Evaluation of the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Small Scale Irrigation

This is a report on the final performance evaluation of the Innovation Lab for Small-Scale Irrigation (ILSSI) project, funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). The evaluation was commissioned by the USAID Bureau for Food Security (BFS) and was independently conducted by an external evaluation team (ET) assembled by the Program Evaluation for Effectiveness and Learning (PEEL) project, led by Mendez England & Associates (ME&A).

Implementation Guide

USAID Biodiversity and Development Handbook - Chapter 4.6: Water Resources

The 2015 USAID Biodiversity and Development Handbook is a foundational resource for implementation of USAID’s Biodiversity Policy. 

Chapter Four of USAID's Biodiversity and Development Handbook contains sections that are a primer on integration of biodiversity into key development sectors. Chapter 4.6 is focused on the intersection of biodiversity conservation and water resources. The following topics are covered:

Fact Sheet

Nepal Fact Sheet: Digo Jal Bakas

This project focuses on the urgent need for addressing water resources management in western Nepal, a region that is lagging in economic growth, has high prevalence of biodiversity hotspots, and is extremely vulnerable to climate change impacts. Four main outcomes are targeted from the project implementation:

Blog

Safeguarding Sustainability: At the Launch of a Groundbreaking New Effort in the Mara River Basin, Cooperation is Key

In the Maasai language, “Mara” means “spotted,” and as you look out over the plains of the Mara River Basin, you can see how the region got its name. The savanna is dotted with plants and animals alike: thorn trees and shrubs, lions, giraffes, migrating wildebeests. One of the most biodiverse regions in the world, the Mara is kept alive by the river flowing through it.

Global Waters Article

RESILIM: Addressing the Water Shortage Puzzle in Southern Africa

River basins in southern Africa, like river basins around the world, are under threat from increasing water use and shifting rainfall patterns, which are exaggerating flood and drought cycles and degrading water quality. It is hard enough for one country to adapt to these changing conditions, but most of the world’s water basins — 263 lake and river basins, covering almost half of the earth’s nonocean surface — cross national boundaries. To ensure that collaboration rather than competition wins out in basin management, neighboring countries need to work together.

Global Waters Article

A Win-Win Approach to Biodiversity

Uganda’s Budongo-Bugoma Forest Corridor, situated in the north of the Albertine Rift, is considered to be one the most biodiverse regions of Africa, well known for its chimpanzee population. However, this biodiversity hotspot is under pressure from high population growth, deforestation, and seasonal water supply extremes — and the flash point is often access to water. Elsewhere in South Africa’s dry Eastern Cape Province, the country’s last free-flowing river, the Mzimvubu, is experiencing environmental stresses of its own.