Water Security Implementation – SWP Toolkit #5

Water Security Implementation is the fifith in a series of six toolkits from the Sustainable Water Partnership (SWP). It provides a brief introduction to water security, as well as a detailed walkthrough of SWP’s five-step Water Security Improvement (WSI) process. The success of that process depends on the implementation of activities or measures defined through collaborative planning and decision-making with the purpose of addressing and mitigating priority water risks now and in the future.

Acting Global Water Coordinator Inaugurates New Drinking Water Supply in Busia County, Kenya

The USAID-supported Kenya Integrated Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (KIWASH) project works to improve the lives and health of one million Kenyans in nine counties. Launched in 2015, the five-year project focuses on the development and management of sustainable water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) services and increased access to irrigation and nutrition services.

Funding Water Security - SWP Toolkit #4

Funding Water Security is the fourth in a series of six toolkits from the Sustainable Water Partnership (SWP). This series of toolkits presents an effective and efficient process to address water risks, including long-term water stresses that constrain social and economic development and sudden shocks that can quickly jeopardize the health and livelihoods of vulnerable populations.

This toolkit is designed to improve stakeholder capacity to investigate and evaluate the current and possible sources for funding water security activities in a geographic focus area. 

Water Currents - Water Conflict

Competition and conflict over water resources extends back thousands of years. Water is a fundamental and irreplaceable resource in all societies. Therefore, it is not surprising that water management is complex and that water-related interests are frequently contested. The risk of water-related violence and conflict is growing, as scarce water resources face ever-increasing pressures from growing populations and environmental degradation.

Africa, WASH, and the Millennium Development Goals: A Local Systems Case Study of How South Africa Achieved MDG Target 7c

Democratic dispensation in 1994 created a political and social platform that reshaped life in South Africa. There was a surge in common belief that the inequity and wrong of Apartheid should and could be rectified. Equity of access to water and sanitation were obvious targets for improvement. In 1994, an estimated 14–15 million South Africans were without access to an improved water supply, while close to 21 million—more than half of the population at that time—did not have access to improved sanitation facilities. These problems were most severe in poorer rural areas.

Africa, WASH, and the Millennium Development Goals: A Local Systems Case Study of How Senegal Achieved MDG Target 7c

Nationally, Senegal met the MDG target for water supply access. It did this by engaging the public and private sectors to effectively invest and report on investments. It focused on larger population centers, less on remote regions of the country. Its achievements set the stage for more equitable and widespread service provision as the country now works to achieve the SDGs, requiring sustainable management of universal access.