disaster risk reduction

Article

Backyard Cooperation Leads to Wastewater Treatment

Carola Piña was ashamed to have visitors. The single mom and her two teenage sons shared a one-bedroom house with a collapsed sewage septic system that left them exposed to wastewater. “We just could not endure the stench,” she says. “Not us, not our neighbors.”

Video

SERVIR: Connecting Space to Village

SERVIR is helping people in more than 45 countries access and use satellite imagery and climate and weather information to make better decisions about development. A collaboration between USAID and NASA, SERVIR has established hubs in West Africa, Eastern and Southern Africa, Hindu Kush-Himalaya, and Lower Mekong regions by partnering with regional technical institutions. SERVIR is helping to integrate science into useful products and tools that support better decisions about livelihoods, disasters, and economic development.

Video

What is SERVIR? Motiongraphic

Learn how the SERVIR program is harnessing the power of science and technology for development in this two minute video narrated by Astronaut Mae Jemison.

About SERVIR

Disaster Risk Reduction

Disaster risk reduction encompasses efforts to prevent or mitigate damage inflicted by earthquakes, floods, droughts, and storms.

Water Currents

Water Currents: Emergency WASH

Water Currents is produced biweekly by USAID’s E3 Water Office. Each issue contains recent news and articles on water sector issues, partner and donor updates, latest sector research, and a special focus on one topic. Please provide your feedback and suggestions by contacting the waterteam@usaid.gov.

Real Impact

Real Impact: Be Secure - Water Security for Resilient Economic Growth and Stability

The Philippines has emerged as one of the fastest growing economies in Southeast Asia, with GDP growth averaging 6 percent between 2010 and 2016. Despite the growth, poverty still persists, exacerbated by 15 million Filipinos lacking access to clean water, and 26.5 million with little or no access to sanitation facilities.

Much of the population is vulnerable to changing weather patterns that include less rain, longer dry seasons, increased flooding, and more violent storms. Further complicating the situation are the approximately 20 typhoons that hit the country annually.

Article

Bolstering Water Security and Supply in Afghanistan

When disaster strikes, the most urgent task for emergency responders is to restore access to safe drinking water to stave off waterborne disease outbreaks that often follow. Afghanistan is extremely prone to disasters, both natural and man-made. In April and May of 2014, 17 provinces in northern Afghanistan experienced the worst seasonal flooding in 100 years. The floods killed more than 200 people, wiped out homes, and destroyed or contaminated wells and other sources of water.

Website

U.S.-Pakistan Center for Advanced Studies in Water

The United States Government through United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and Government of Pakistan through the Higher Education Commission (HEC) have partnered together to create state of art centers for advanced studies.