river basin management

Report

What Does Climate Change Mean for the Limpopo Basin?

The objective of the Resilience in the Limpopo Basin Program (RESILIM) of USAID Southern Africa is to enhance the resilience of people and ecosystems in the Limpopo Basin Program (LRB) by strengthening the capacity of the Limpopo Watercourse Commission (LIMCOM), and its key stakeholders, to address issues of climate change adaptation and biodiversity conservation within the context of trans-boundary integrated water resources management (IWRM).

Article

Community-Based Efforts to Contain Trash and Protect Waterways

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has worked with Panama, Jamaica, and Peru, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of State and Peace Corps, to reduce their land-based sources of trash pollution in waterways. EPA’s Trash Free Waters (TFW) approach is a stakeholder-based strategy to reduce land-based sources of marine litter through better management of trash pollution in inland waterways and coastal waters. These practices focus on community-based efforts that prevent and reduce trash in waterways and, ultimately, the oceans.

Webinar

Watershed Moments in the Mara

New Beginnings in Transboundary Water Cooperation

Winding for nearly 14,000 kilometers, the Mara River is a vital source of life in Kenya and Tanzania. The river traverses the towering Mau Forest, wanders through tea plantations and growing settlements in the upper Basin, and waters the rangelands of Maasai pastoral communities. The river also sustains the region’s stunning biodiversity, from forest ecosystems to the wildebeests migrating between Serengeti National Park and Maasai Mara National Reserve.

Blog

The River Belongs to the People

Team Leader Gordon Mumbo brings a lifetime of experience to the Mara River Basin.

This blog originally appeared on the Sustainable Water Partnership website.

Gordon Mumbo grew up in the small village of Kamuga, in Kenya’s Kisumu County. Year after year, he watched as frequent floods from one of Kenya’s major rivers, the Nyando, disturbed the peaceful flow of village life.

Blog

Safeguarding Sustainability: At the Launch of a Groundbreaking New Effort in the Mara River Basin, Cooperation is Key

In the Maasai language, “Mara” means “spotted,” and as you look out over the plains of the Mara River Basin, you can see how the region got its name. The savanna is dotted with plants and animals alike: thorn trees and shrubs, lions, giraffes, migrating wildebeests. One of the most biodiverse regions in the world, the Mara is kept alive by the river flowing through it.

PhotoEssay

Photo Essay: Protecting the Source of the Limpopo River

This Exposure story describes efforts of the USAID Resilience in the Limpopo River Basin (RESILIM) project to protect the Marico River catchment, one of eleven sub-catchments that form the Limpopo River Basin. RESILIM (2012–2020) works Botswana, Mozambique, South Africa, and Zimbabwe f to preserve the health of the Limpopo River.

Scroll down in the window below to view the photo essay.