rivers

Report

Promoting Development in Shared River Basins : Tools for Enhancing Transboundary Basin Management

The world’s 286 transboundary river basins support the socioeconomic well-being of more than 40 percent of its population, as well as the ecosystems on which they depend. The use of shared water resources by one country will, in most cases, impact other countries sharing the same system. Coordination among countries in the development of transboundary basins can reap greater mutual benefits than would otherwise be available to countries pursuing individual development.

Article

Taking the Pulse of a Water Lifeline to Hundreds of Millions of People

The great intersecting mountain ranges of Central and South Asia collectively stretch thousands of miles across the continent. Within this vast, often impenetrable, and sparsely inhabited wilderness, snowfields and glaciers store water that has fallen as precipitation and accumulated over the course of years, decades, or in some cases, even centuries. 

Report

Climate Change and Water Resources in West Africa: Transboundary River Basins

This document is part of a series of studies produced by the African and Latin American Resilience to Climate Change (ARCC) project that addresses adaptation to climate change in West Africa. Within the ARCC West Africa studies, this document falls in the subseries Climate Change and Water Resources in West Africa. ARCC undertook the West Africa water studies to increase understanding of the potential impacts of climate change on water resources in West Africa and identify means to support adaptation to these changes.

Article

Collaboration for Watershed Conservation in Nepal

In western Nepal, pollution, fishing with electric current, explosive devices, and other destructive practices threaten the biodiversity of the country's great rivers and the generations-old cultural traditions of fishing communities. But the tide is turning in some of these communities, where those who once contributed to the problem are increasingly becoming part of the solution.

Article

Community-Based Efforts to Contain Trash and Protect Waterways

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has worked with Panama, Jamaica, and Peru, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of State and Peace Corps, to reduce their land-based sources of trash pollution in waterways. EPA’s Trash Free Waters (TFW) approach is a stakeholder-based strategy to reduce land-based sources of marine litter through better management of trash pollution in inland waterways and coastal waters. These practices focus on community-based efforts that prevent and reduce trash in waterways and, ultimately, the oceans.

Webinar

Webinar: Mitigating Transboundary Water Conflict and Improving Water Security

Winding for nearly 14,000 kilometers, the Mara River is a vital source of life in Kenya and Tanzania. The river traverses the towering Mau Forest, wanders through tea plantations and growing settlements in the upper Basin, and waters the rangelands of Maasai pastoral communities. The river also sustains the region’s stunning biodiversity, from forest ecosystems to the wildebeests migrating between Serengeti National Park and Maasai Mara National Reserve.

Focus Area Topic

Water Resources Management

Water resources management encompasses the efforts of stakeholders to protect freshwater ecosystems that provide drinking water.

Why it Matters