sustainability

Annual Report Story

Applying a Sustainability Lens to Past Projects to Inform the Future

Sustainable WASH investments underpin USAID’s Water and Development Plan. Achieving sustainability requires country partners and communities to have ownership of processes and systems in place to ensure that inputs and resources are able to be sustained after an activity ends. Monitoring and evaluation during activity implementation provide insight into USAID-funded activities' performance, but after the activity ends it is difficult to know if the outcomes observed will be sustained.

Project

USAID Water and Sanitation Project

The WATSAN project began in December 2017 with the primary goal to reduce the prevalence of cholera and other waterborne diseases by laying foundation for a long-term, sustained effort to increase access to safe drinking water and sanitation in Haiti – this improving the health and well-being of Haitians. Specifically, WATSAN seeks to increase access to sustainable water supply services; increase access to sustainable sanitation services; and strengthen the enabling environment for sustainable delivery, operation, and maintenance of WASH services.

Water Currents

Water Currents: Learning from Failures

Many international development projects have unintended negative consequences. Without post-implementation evaluation, these unintended consequences can go unnoticed by almost everyone—except the people who were supposed to benefit from the project. Even with evaluations, water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) professionals are often reluctant to share poor findings due to perceived repercussions. However, allowing others to learn from mistakes could help to prevent the same problems from happening again.
 

Report

A Water Infrastructure Audit of Kitui County

In Kitui County, Kenya, an information gap exists on water coverage and quality of water service delivery for a large segment of the county population. To fill this gap, the Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership (SWS) supported the University of Oxford to undertake a water audit in seven sub-counties from November to December 2017. The water audit located major rural water infrastructure and collected information on installation and operational performance to inform county planning, investment, institutional development, and dialogue on sustainability.

Video

The PREPARED Project

The Planning for Resilience in East Africa through Policy, Adaptation, Research, and Economic Development (PREPARED) Project was a five-year initiative funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) to strengthen the resilience and sustainability of East Africa economies, transboundary and freshwater ecosystems and communities targeting three key development challenges of East Africa: : climate change adaptation, biodiversi

Fact Sheet

USAID's WASH-FIN Cambodia

Closing financing gaps to achieve universal access to water supply through improved creditworthiness of private water operators.

Fact Sheet

USAID's WASH-FIN Southern Africa

Closing financing gaps for universal water and sanitation access through sustainable and transparent business models, increased public funding, and expanded market finance for infrastructure investment.

Article

Short-Term Interventions Address Health Care Facility Deficiencies

When responding to outbreaks of cholera, typhoid fever, Ebola virus, and other infectious diseases the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) often works with partners to improve drinking water safety and hygiene in health care facilities (HCFs). Typical engagements include distributing locally made, portable handwashing and drinking water stations; providing education; and supplying soap for handwashing and products for onsite chlorination of drinking water.

Article

Strengthening Zambia’s WASH Infrastructure Improves Health, Changes Lives

The Millennium Challenge Corporation’s (MCC’s) Zambia Compact provided $355 million to improve the water supply, sanitation, and drainage infrastructure in the capital city of Lusaka. It also supported the government’s ongoing water sector reform efforts by strengthening partner institutions and facilitating potential private sector investment opportunities. Approximately 1.2 million Zambians are expected to benefit from these investments over the next 20 years.