women and girls

Blog

Exploring the Intersection of Women and Improved Water Access

With International Women’s Day celebrated March 8 and World Water Day on March 22, it is a month for big ideas—about women and about water. On March 21, the intersection of these two crosscutting development issues and their respective global campaign days brought together advocates, practitioners, academics, and organizations passionate about championing women’s roles in improving access to water for a jointly hosted event titled “Call to Action: Supporting Women through Water.” The U.S.

Intl Campaign Day

Menstrual Hygiene Day 2019

Poor menstrual hygiene caused by a lack of education on the issue, persisting taboos and stigma, limited access to hygienic menstrual products and poor sanitation infrastructure undermines the educational opportunities, health and overall social status of women and girls around the world. As a result, millions of women and girls are kept from reaching their full potential.

Conference

2018 Virtual Conference on MHM in Schools

The Virtual Conference on Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM) in Schools provides an opportunity to hear the latest research and programming on menstrual health and hygiene from around the world. This year's conference will focus on the 'MHM in Ten' five priorities identified for transforming MHM in schools by 2024.  
 

Blog

Where to Find USAID at the 2018 UNC Water and Health Conference

The Water and Health Conference: Where Science Meets Policy will take place October 29–November 2, 2018, at the University of North Carolina ­(UNC)-Chapel Hill. The UNC Water Institute’s annual event has grown to become one of the most important gatherings in the water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) sector held in the United States. The conference this year focuses on five themes:

Blog

The Ripple Effect: Supporting Women’s Empowerment through Water

New research demonstrates that improving a woman’s access to water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) provides a multitude of indirect and positive impacts that often are overlooked in traditional development interventions. Benefits of this water access “ripple effect” go beyond the time savings and health outcomes that are well known across the sector. Referred to as “pathways to empowerment,” these now-quantifiable impacts cover a range of outcomes, including a more than 50 percent increase in female community leadership positions and shifts in gender norms within the community.