Water Currents: Gender and WASH

Women and girls are disproportionately affected by lack of access to water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) services. Their needs differ from men in terms of sanitation, they spend more of their time collecting water, yet they have less say about household and community decisions made on WASH services. Similarly, women throughout the developing world face different barriers than men in terms of their involvement in WASH-related professions, such as utility management.

A Clean Break, a Fresh Start

Learn how students, teachers, and USAID are teaming up for better health in East Java, Indonesia.

A Troublesome Toilet

At Ngalah School in Pasuruan, Indonesia, over 330 girls had to share Dorm D’s solitary bathroom—more like a locker room or public pool facility than anything else.

"It was dirty. Bugs were everywhere,” said 19-year-old Anis Faridah, the girls’ student leader. “There weren’t enough toilets or enough showers."

Toolkit for Monitoring and Evaluating Gender-Based Violence Interventions Along the Relief to Development Continuum

USAID developed this toolkit to support the implementation of the U.S. Strategy to Prevent and Respond to Gender-based Violence Globally. It provides guidance to USAID staff, implementing partners and the larger community of international relief and development practitioners on how to monitor and evaluate gender-based violence (GBV) interventions along the Relief to Development Continuum (RDC). The RDC is divided broadly into three phases: (1) the pre-crisis phase, (2) the crisis phase, and (3) the post-crisis phase.

Menstrual Hygiene Management Toolkit

Menstrual hygiene management (MHM) is an important component of a “WASH-Friendly School.” As a new concept in schools, the USAID-funded Schools Promoting Learning Achievement through Sanitation and Hygiene (SPLASH) project and Zambia’s Ministry of Education, Science, Vocational Training and Early Education (MESVTEE) are offering various kinds of support to teachers to establish MHM programs and facilities to keep girls and female teachers in school.

#MenstruationMatters: Celebrating Menstrual Hygiene Day 2017

Let’s talk about menstruation. Only one out of two girls in India and one out of every four girls in Tanzania and Ethiopia knows about menstruation before the start of their first cycle. For this reason, education is this year’s theme for Menstrual Hygiene Day, taking place May 28.

Where WASH Saves Lives: Creating New Traditions in Nepal

On her first night of menstruation, and for every night of her period, 15-year-old Roshani Tiruwa was expected to leave the warmth and safety of her family home and sleep in a tiny windowless hut barely large enough to stretch out in. She ate less dinner than usual because, by custom, women are not allowed to eat dairy at this point in their cycle.

Water Currents: Celebrating Menstrual Hygiene Day

Celebrated worldwide on May 28 each year, Menstrual Hygiene Day (MHD) is a global initiative that brings together organizations, individuals, and the media to raise awareness about menstrual hygiene management (MHM). This issue of Water Currents contains information on MHD events, select 2017 and 2016 publications and videos on the topic, links to relevant websites, and news articles.

Tackling Water Issues Lightens the Load for Garment Workers

The apparel industry employs millions of people throughout the world, a majority of whom are women. In many garment-producing countries women also bear the disproportionate burden for household responsibilities, particularly water collection.

Lack of access to safe drinking water and sanitation takes up their time, affects their health, lowers their income-earning potential, and stands in the way of caring for families and improving their education.