water treatment

Country Profile

Egypt

Since 1978, USAID has invested more than $3.5 billion to bring potable water and sanitation services to over 25 million Egyptians. USAID constructed and rehabilitated wastewater systems in Cairo, Alexandria, and the three Suez Canal cities. Later, USAID helped the Government of Egypt establish the Holding Company for Water and Wastewater, a water regulator and a national umbrella organization to standardize and govern local water utility companies. USAID worked with the GOE to strengthen the policy, legal, and regulatory framework for water distribution and access.

Resource Collection

Water Quality

The chemical, biological, and radiological characteristics of water determine its quality. Under the U.S. Government Global Water Strategy, USAID has established a goal to provide sustainable access to safe drinking water services to 15 million people by 2022. USAID has also committed to improve not only the reliability of the drinking water provided through our interventions, but also the quality of that water.

Brief

Chlorine Tablet Use for Household Water Treatment in Emergencies: Guidance for Tablet Selection

In emergencies, safe drinking water is a priority to prevent disease. Chlorine is often used to treat drinking water, as it inactivates most bacteria and viruses that cause diarrheal disease and the remaining free chlorine residual (FCR) provides protection against recontamination in storage. For effective treatment, water should be dosed with enough chlorine to ensure that FCR is maintained for the length of storage time in the household. At the same time, levels high enough to exceed taste and odor acceptability thresholds should be avoided. 

News Link

United States and Egypt Inaugurate Water Facilities in Assiut

USAID, in cooperation with the Assiut Potable Water and Sanitation Company and Egypt’s Holding Company for Water and Wastewater, recently inaugurated the Massara Water Treatment Plant and the Alexandria El Tahreer Wastewater Pump Station and Collection System in Assiut Governorate.

Report

2012 Guidelines for Water Reuse

As a collaborative effort between EPA and USAID, this document’s primary purpose is to facilitate further development of water reuse by serving as an authoritative reference on water reuse practices. The document updates and builds on the 2004 Guidelines for Water Reuse by incorporating information on water reuse that has been developed since the 2004 document was issued. The 2012 guidelines also provide more than 100 new case studies from around the world that highlight how reuse applications can and do work in the real world.

Article

Short-Term Interventions Address Health Care Facility Deficiencies

When responding to outbreaks of cholera, typhoid fever, Ebola virus, and other infectious diseases the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) often works with partners to improve drinking water safety and hygiene in health care facilities (HCFs). Typical engagements include distributing locally made, portable handwashing and drinking water stations; providing education; and supplying soap for handwashing and products for onsite chlorination of drinking water.

Article

Deploying WASH Technicians to Improve WASH Services

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been working with Haiti’s National Potable Water and Sanitation Directorate (DINEPA in French) to improve drinking water quality in Haiti's rural areas. This work, which began after the start of the cholera outbreak in Haiti in 2010 and continued through 2018, is aligned with the Global Water Strategy Strategic Objective 1: to increase sustainable access to water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services, as well as Strategic Objective 4: to strengthen water sector governance and institutions.  

Communities of Practice

International Network on Household Water Treatment and Safe Storage

The International Network on Household Water Treatment and Safe Storage (HWTS Network) is a World Health Organization and United Nations Children’s Fund initiative bringing together over 150 key stakeholders worldwide to promote and scale up the adoption of practices and technologies that improve the quality of household drinking water for vulnerable populations. The informal network format emphasizes flexibility, participation and creativity to support coordinated action.