water resources management (WRM)

Webinar

Transboundary Aquifer Management Continued: US-Mexico Lessons Learned

15:00 SAST  |  06:00 PT  |  09:00 ET

James Callegary is a hydrologist with the USGS and holds a doctorate in Soil and Water Science from the University of Arizona. He will be discussing lessons learned from his 15 years working along the US-Mexico border with special emphasis on the Transboundary Aquifer Assessment Program. James also conducts research on groundwater-surface-water interactions, watershed restoration, and carbon sequestration. Register and learn more using the button below:

Event

Hidden Forces: The Role of Water in Economic Prosperity

Safe and accessible water is critical for a country’s successful economic development and for the health and well-being of its citizens. Ultimately, the journey to self-reliance cannot succeed without sustainable water resource management. This session will explore the role of market-based solutions and private sector engagement in strengthening the management of water resources to meet the needs of communities, agriculture, industry and commerce, and ecosystem services.  

Brief

Brief: Water Security and Sanitation at USAID

USAID’s water and sanitation assistance has resulted in millions of people gaining access to improved drinking water and sanitation services. Reliable access to safe water and sanitation saves lives, reduces extreme poverty, and makes communities more resilient. Investments in water and sanitation are critical for progress in nearly all aspects of global development.

This fact sheet provides data to describe the water crisis and to illustrate the success of USAID's efforts in helping communities around the world to access improved water and sanitation services.

Water Currents

Water Currents: Transboundary Waters

According to the United Nations (UN), transboundary waters—the aquifers and lake and river basins shared by two or more countries—account for an estimated 60 percent of global freshwater flow and are home to more than 40 percent of the world’s population. Depleted and degraded transboundary water supplies have the potential to cause social unrest and spark conflict among countries.

Report

Promoting Development in Shared River Basins : Tools for Enhancing Transboundary Basin Management

The world’s 286 transboundary river basins support the socioeconomic well-being of more than 40 percent of its population, as well as the ecosystems on which they depend. The use of shared water resources by one country will, in most cases, impact other countries sharing the same system. Coordination among countries in the development of transboundary basins can reap greater mutual benefits than would otherwise be available to countries pursuing individual development.

Webinar

Webinar: Sharing Experience on Gender Mainstreaming in Transboundary Water Bodies

In the last decades, the awareness on the reasons why gender should be particularly mainstreamed in the water realm rapidly grew. Investing in gender mainstreaming in water programs is fundamental and now well justified, because it represents a step forward towards the realization of the SDGs and of the 2030 agenda. This is particularly true and even more challenging in the case of transboundary water bodies, which require cooperation and collaboration among the various authorities in charge of waters across the national borders, based on mutual trust and on transparency.

Topic

Water Resources Management

Water resources management encompasses the efforts of stakeholders to protect freshwater ecosystems that provide drinking water. USAID helps partner countries better cope with rising pressures on water-stressed river basins by engaging with stakeholders to develop water allocation plans that secure the availability of water for households, improve storage and quality of water through sustainably managed watersheds, and promote adaptive innovations to build resilience and reduce water-related risk.

Project

Non-Revenue Water Activity

Jordan loses over 50 percent of its precious water to non-revenue water (NRW). NRW is water loss in the system due to illegal theft, leakage, or inaccurate metering. The NRW activity will support the GOJ to achieve the ambitious targets from the National Water Strategy of reducing NRW by 3 to 6 percent per year. The end goal is an overall reduction of 25 percent nationally by the year 2025.USAID investments in NRW will improve drinking water availability and cost recovery for Jordanian water utilities.

Water Currents

Water Currents: Water Security

The U.S. Government Global Water Strategy sets water security as its overarching goal. The strategy envisions a water-secure world, where people and nations have the water they need to be healthy, prosperous, and resilient. Achieving water security requires understanding how complicated and interconnected social, environmental, political, and economic factors shape access to safe drinking water and sustainable management of water resources.
 

Training

Online Course: Water Integrity Principles and Concepts

The critical weaknesses of the water sector can be solved only by providing a more transparent, participatory, and accountable water management. Integrity, accountability, and anti-corruption are critical in governing the resources and in providing quality service for all. Fighting corruption requires leadership and courage, but also demands knowledge of the phenomenon to stimulate new capacities and boost change in water resources management.