water resources management (WRM)

Strategy and Guidance

Preparing Smallholder Farm Families to Adapt to Climate Change | Pocket Guide 3: Managing Water Resources

Many of the families who farm small, unirrigated plots in the tropics already struggle against poverty, degraded land, and rainfall that varies from year to year. This type of farming, sometimes called rainfed agriculture, is especially vulnerable to climate change. This guide is part of set, Preparing Smallholder Farm Families to Adapt to Climate Change, written for development practitioners working in the agriculture sector. The concepts, information and practices in these guides are meant to support work with farm families and to help reduce their risks from weather changes.

Webinar

Transboundary Aquifer Management Continued: US-Mexico Lessons Learned

15:00 SAST  |  06:00 PT  |  09:00 ET

James Callegary is a hydrologist with the USGS and holds a doctorate in Soil and Water Science from the University of Arizona. He will be discussing lessons learned from his 15 years working along the US-Mexico border with special emphasis on the Transboundary Aquifer Assessment Program. James also conducts research on groundwater-surface-water interactions, watershed restoration, and carbon sequestration. Register and learn more using the button below:

Event

Hidden Forces: The Role of Water in Economic Prosperity

Safe and accessible water is critical for a country’s successful economic development and for the health and well-being of its citizens. Ultimately, the journey to self-reliance cannot succeed without sustainable water resource management.

Fact Sheet

Water Security and Sanitation at USAID

USAID’s water and sanitation assistance has resulted in millions of people gaining access to improved drinking water and sanitation services. Reliable access to safe water and sanitation saves lives, reduces extreme poverty, and makes communities more resilient. Investments in water and sanitation are critical for progress in nearly all aspects of global development.

This fact sheet provides data to describe the water crisis and to illustrate the success of USAID's efforts in helping communities around the world to access improved water and sanitation services.

Water Currents

Water Currents: Transboundary Waters

According to the United Nations (UN), transboundary waters—the aquifers and lake and river basins shared by two or more countries—account for an estimated 60 percent of global freshwater flow and are home to more than 40 percent of the world’s population. Depleted and degraded transboundary water supplies have the potential to cause social unrest and spark conflict among countries.

Report

Promoting Development in Shared River Basins : Tools for Enhancing Transboundary Basin Management

The world’s 286 transboundary river basins support the socioeconomic well-being of more than 40 percent of its population, as well as the ecosystems on which they depend. The use of shared water resources by one country will, in most cases, impact other countries sharing the same system. Coordination among countries in the development of transboundary basins can reap greater mutual benefits than would otherwise be available to countries pursuing individual development.