water conservation

Interagency Story

Engaging Communities Through Landscape-Level Water Conservation in Jordan

The three main goals of WADI are to 1) establish soil and water conservation sites that serve as reference models for scaling watershed restoration techniques; 2) build shared ownership in practices that foster sustainable water conservation and land stewardship; 3) promote sustainable operation of high-quality native seedling nurseries. 

Interagency Story

Planning for Soil and Water Conservation Workshops—from Organizing to Action

Water is a limited resource impacting both economic development and food security, and agriculture is the single largest user of water resources in many countries across the globe. Pakistan is no exception. Agriculture directly supports the country's population and accounts for 26 percent of its gross domestic product. Rapid population increase, infrastructure issues, loss of reservoir storage capacity, and climate fluctuations have led to major water availability concerns.

Global Waters Article

Social Media for Social Good: Raising Awareness of Jordan’s Water Crisis

Hanan Ahyad is a resident of Jordan’s capital and largest city Amman. She is a domestic customer of the local water utility company, Miyahuna, and has always been aware of her country’s limited water resources. However, she did not understand the extent of the water crisis and how she could help until she came across a mysterious and innovative water conservation campaign in the summer of 2019.

Resource Collection

Agricultural Water Management

Agricultural water management (AWM) seeks to use water in a way that provides crops and animals the amount of water they need, enhances productivity, and conserves natural resources for the benefit of downstream users and ecosystem services.

Why Agricultural Water Management Matters

Final Report

Securing Mountain Water and Livelihoods Project, 2014-2017 – Final Report

The Securing Mountain Water and Livelihoods Project was launched in April 2014 and was implemented by The Mountain Institute (TMI) in partnership with University of Texas, Austin (UTA) over three years under a cooperative agreement with the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) as part of the larger USAID-Peru Climate Change Adaptation Program.

The Project’s aim was to improve communities’ capacities for landscape management for the conservation of ecosystems and to contribute to human well-being in the context of climate change.