urban sanitation

Annual Report Story

Making Sludge Removal a Better Business

In West Africa, sanitation access for the urban poor is extremely low. A significant portion of the population living in informal settlements resorts to open defecation, and those that have sanitation access often share a poorly maintained latrine with multiple families. Cholera outbreaks are not unusual. And prohibitive prices for fecal sludge collection services—a necessity for the type of onsite sanitation in these neighborhoods—stop many landlords and poor households from investing in latrines and proper waste disposal.

Fact Sheet

Fact Sheet: West Africa Sanitation Service Delivery (SSD)

Some of the lowest rates of improved sanitation in the world are found in three project countries: Benin (13 percent), Côte d’Ivoire (14 percent), and Ghana (28 percent). Each country lacks affordable options for safe disposal and treatment of human waste. Densely populated areas, such as slum communities, have limited space to construct household toilets and land disputes coupled with a lack of urban planning complicate this problem.

Evaluation

Midterm Evaluation of the Sanitation Service Delivery (SSD) Project: Final Report

USAID/West Africa’s Sanitation Service Delivery (SSD) Project seeks to dramatically scale-up sanitation services delivery through market-based approaches that strategically complement the recent policy shifts and massive demand generation efforts in West Africa. The SSD program will develop, test, and market-based business models (BMs), reaching all segments of the unserved population, to achieve and sustain an improved level of sanitation service over time.

Final Report

Sustainable Water and Sanitation in Africa (SUWASA) – Final Report

The Sustainable Water and Sanitation in Africa (SUWASA) program was implemented from 2005–2009 to improve access to safe, reliable, affordable, and sustainable water and sanitation services for unserved and underserved urban populations in sub-Sahara Africa. The program fostered urban water sector reforms to solve policy, institutional, regulatory, financial, and operational challenges that hindered the effective delivery of sustainable water and sanitation services for urban residents in nine African nations.

Report

A Journey of Institutional Change: Extending Water Services to Nairobi’s Informal Settlements

This Topic Brief sets out the process of institutional change undergone by Nairobi City Water & Sewerage Company (NCWSC) to extend services to the informal settlements of Nairobi.

Beginning with the creation of an Informal Settlements Department (ISD) in 2009, the utility has implemented a set of structural reforms, strategies and service delivery approaches which have engendered significant progress towards citywide service provision, and which can be instructive for utilities facing similar challenges across sub-Saharan Africa.