sanitation

Report

African Sanitation Academy: Market and Feasibility Study in Southern Africa

This study is based on interviews with 66 key informants and officials from countries in Southern Africa, which together with limited desktop research, were conducted to gather and compile information and explore the possibilities for sanitation leadership training in the region. The Southern Africa study carefully considered the capacity building and leadership training needs of the urban sanitation sector (more than the rural sector).

Report

African Sanitation Academy: Feasibility Report

This report collates the regional feasibility studies, which indicate that a lack of leadership in the sanitation sector is a significant factor contributing to poor performance. They also highlight the limited existing opportunities for developing leadership and management competencies through short, focused, “just-in-time” methods that meet the needs of the individual. Overall, the data has shown a high degree of congruence on whether it is feasible to create an ASA and what it should look like.

Report

African Sanitation Academy: Market and Feasibility Study in East Africa

There are still many people who do not have access to improved sanitation and hygiene facilities or services in East Africa. For cities and other areas throughout the region, a lack of core country systems for sanitation, and a weak enabling environment, means that the building blocks for sanitation management and leadership are absent. To make the situation more challenging, targeting and implementation of sanitation improvements are clearly not meeting the needs of lower-income areas.

Report

African Sanitation Academy: Market and Feasibility Study in West Africa

There are still many people who do not have access to improved sanitation and hygiene facilities or services in West Africa. For cities and other areas throughout the region, a lack of core country systems for sanitation, and a weak enabling environment, means that the building blocks for sanitation management and leadership are absent. To make the situation more challenging, targeting and implementation of sanitation improvements are clearly not meeting the needs of lower-income areas.

Report

USAID Transform WASH: Financing Practices and Options for Sanitation Products and Services: Findings from SNNPR, Ethiopia

USAID Transform WASH aims to improve water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) outcomes in Ethiopia by increasing access to and sustained use of affordable, quality WASH products and services, with a substantial focus on sanitation. It does so by transforming the market for WASH: stimulating demand at the community level, strengthening supply chains and building the enabling environment for a vibrant private market.

WASH and Health

Through water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) investments, the water sector works to improve health outcomes, providing improved access to safe water supply and sanitation, while promoting improved hygiene practices and supporting approaches that can be brought to scale and sustained. These services can improve health, lower health care costs, and save time, particularly for poorer populations. The results can be immediate and long-term, providing vital economic and social benefits to millions of people.

Blog

Celebrate World Toilet Day

This Sunday, November 19, let’s take some time to reflect. For billions in the developing world proper sanitation can mean the difference between education and ignorance, health and illness, prosperity and poverty. But 2.5 billion people still don’t have access to a toilet, and 11 percent of the world’s population still defecates in the open.