rural water supply

Brief

Brief: Millennium Water and Sanitation Program (PEPAM/USAID) Ex-Post Evaluation

This brief outlines the key findings from an ex-post evaluation of the Millennium Water and Sanitation Program in Senegal (PEPAM/USAID – Programme d’Eau Potable et d’Assainissement du Millénaire au Sénégal). Implemented from 2009–2014 by Research Triangle Institute (RTI) and a consortium of partners, PEPAM aimed to improve sustainable access to water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) in four regions of Senegal.

Topic

Rural

Rural areas face a unique set of geographic and financial challenges when it comes to extending reliable water and sanitation services to residents. USAID works with local partners throughout the world to increase rural populations’ access to safe water, improve sanitation coverage, and promote hygiene behavior change. This collection page contains resources showcasing best practices and lessons learned for WASH infrastructure and services in rural settings.

Topic

Drinking Water

Access to safe drinking water is one of the cornerstones of public health; however, more than 660 million people around the world still lack access to a dependable drinking water supply. USAID helps partner countries reach the poor and assist the underserved in gaining first-time or improved access to basic drinking water services, laying the foundation for a healthier and more water-secure future one neighborhood and community at a time.

Project

Mali Livestock For Growth

The key goal of the USAID Mali Livestock for Growth (L4G) program is to improve the quality of livestock, expand market access and incentives, and include poorer households in livestock value chain
development.

Research/Study

Factors Influencing Revenue Collection for Preventative Maintenance of Community Water Systems: A Fuzzy-Set Qualitative Comparative Analysis

This study analyzed combinations of conditions that influence regular payments for water service in resource-limited communities. To do so, the study investigated 16 communities participating in a new preventive maintenance program in the Kamuli District of Uganda under a public–private partnership framework. The authors include members of the USAID Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership (SWS).

Technical Brief

Sustaining Rural Water: A Comparative Study of Maintenance Models for Community-Managed Schemes

As rural water supply coverage rates rise across many countries, attention is increasingly being paid to finding and implementing cost-effective mechanisms to ensure this improved initial access is sustained over time. Conventional approaches to maintenance have largely been based on voluntary community-based management with communities taking on the burden of maintenance themselves, with limited, if any, support from external agencies or local government. Recently, there have been attempts to professionalize maintenance services and make these services affordable at the point of delivery.