participatory approach

Brief

Finding New Solutions to Strengthen Local Systems and Improve WASH Service Delivery and Sustainability

This fact sheet highlights SWS’s work in Ethiopia and Uganda, where SWS is working with local actors to better understand and strengthen local systems for rural water and small-town sanitation service delivery. In each location, SWS is promoting and facilitating learning alliances as a vehicle for more sector coordination and innovation. These platforms bring together actors at the district and town levels around a shared vision to develop and execute collective actions to strengthen systems for sustaining WASH services.

Blog

Local Investment, Lasting Impact

Cambodian local leaders pledge to lead SWP’s Water Security Improvement Process.

This blog originally appeared on the Sustainable Water Partnership website.

In Cambodia’s Stung Chinit watershed, 40 leaders from civil society and the private sector have pledged to actively participate in the Sustainable Water Partnership’s Water Security Improvement (WSI) process.

Blog

Ethiopian Summit Focuses on Participatory Co-Design to Develop Low-Cost WASH Products

It’s the end of the second week of the USAID Transform Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) Sanitation Co-Design Summit in Hawassa, Ethiopia, where health extension workers, technical and vocational education and training (TVET) instructors, government officials, and community members have teamed with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Design Lab (MIT D-Lab) to create new sanitation and hygiene products for the Ethiopian market.

Toolkit

Water Security Planning - SWP Toolkit #3

Water Security Planning is the third in a series of six toolkits from the Sustainable Water Partnership (SWP).  It provides a brief introduction to water security, as well as a detailed walkthrough of SWP’s five-step Water Security Improvement (WSI) process. The toolkit helps users to identify, define, evaluate, and choose water security activities  based on several key areas, such as mitigation of targeted priority water risks, accounting for positive and negative impacts and externalities, socio-economic and environmental impacts, and direct and indirect costs.

Toolkit

Improving Water Security - SWP Toolkit #1

The Sustainable Water Partnership is proud to present Toolkit #1, a resource for working to improve water security.  This is the first in a series of six toolkits which presents an effective and efficient process to address water risks, including long-term water stresses that constrain social and economic development and sudden shocks that can quickly ruin the health and livelihoods of vulnerable populations. It provides a brief introduction to water security, as well as a detailed walkthrough of SWP’s five-step Water Security Improvement (WSI) process.

Article

Big Gains in Access to Safe Drinking Water: How Four African Countries Did It … and How Others Can, Too

In 1990, the East African nation of Ethiopia stood among the nations in most dire need of water development. Seventeen years of war had left its government and systems in disarray. Only 11 percent of its more than 48 million people had access to piped or other improved water sources; the rest used unimproved sources such as unprotected wells and carted drums. Predictably, Ethiopia and countries in similar straits suffered through high rates of communicable, pandemic, and vector-borne disease, child mortality, and other challenges tied to water, sanitation, and hygiene.