market-based sanitation

Activity

Senegal Projet Assainissement – Changement de Comportement et Eau pour le Senegal

Assainissement – Changement de Comportement et Eau pour le Senegal (ACCES) is a 5-year, $22 million program awarded to Natural Resources Consulting Engineers (NRCE) in 2016 to achieve improvements in nutrition through investments in water, sanitation, and hygiene in six of the most malnourished regions of Senegal. Activities will test and implement proven state-of-the-art approaches and increase sustainability.  Other activities will support achievement of the Mission’s Country Development and Coordination Strategy (CDCS) Results Framework.

Topic

Sanitation

Did you know one out of every three people in the world lacks a hygienic toilet in their homes? Sanitation is more than just toilets, however — it encompasses the facilities, behaviors, and services that prevent diseases caused by contact with human waste. USAID helps partner countries reach the poor and underserved to end open defecation, gain first-time or improved access to basic sanitation services, and move progressively toward safely managed services.

Activity

Rwanda Rural Sanitation Activity (Isuku Iwacu)

The Isuku Iwacu Activity (also known as Rwanda Rural Sanitation Activity) is a four-year rural sanitation project awarded on September 2, 2016, and estimated to be completed by November 9, 2020. The Activity is being executed by a consortium of Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) headed by SNV, and includes World Vision International and Water for People.

Annual Report Story

Creating a Vibrant Private Sector-Driven Sanitation Business in Rwanda

Partnering with the Government of Rwanda and local communities, USAID is working to enhance private-sector involvement in rural sanitation markets to help the nation achieve 100 percent improved sanitation coverage by 2020. Meeting this goal means overcoming a number of challenges, including a shortage of sanitation supplies and contractors; a lack of construction professionals involved in household sanitation; the need for a variety of latrine models that function in unique geographies and take consumer preferences and water access into account; and limited financing options.