improved sanitation

Country Profile

Niger

CONTEXT

Niger is an emerging democracy landlocked in the increasingly unstable Sahel region. It consistently ranks at or near the bottom of the United Nations Human Development Index. USAID assists the Nigerien government and local partners to create economic opportunities and increase civic and political participation for Nigerien youth to help undermine extremist messages and encourage stability in Niger and the region.

APPROACH

Topic

Sanitation

Did you know one out of every three people in the world lacks a hygienic toilet in their homes? Sanitation is more than just toilets, however — it encompasses the facilities, behaviors, and services that prevent diseases caused by contact with human waste. USAID helps partner countries reach the poor and underserved to end open defecation, gain first-time or improved access to basic sanitation services, and move progressively toward safely managed services.

Blog

7th Africa Water Week: Canisius Kanangire and Richard Rapier on Strategic Planning for Africa’s Water and Sanitation Sectors

“The changes on the African continent are very much alarming—when we talk of sanitation and look at the growth of the populations in Africa, and also the urbanization phenomenon, with the growth of slums,” said Dr. Canisius Kanangire, Executive Secretary of the African Ministers’ Council on Water (AMCOW), acknowledging the challenges facing the region in a recent interview with USAID’s Global Waters Radio.

Blog

Where to Find USAID at the 2018 UNC Water and Health Conference

The Water and Health Conference: Where Science Meets Policy will take place October 29–November 2, 2018, at the University of North Carolina ­(UNC)-Chapel Hill. The UNC Water Institute’s annual event has grown to become one of the most important gatherings in the water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) sector held in the United States. The conference this year focuses on five themes:

Blog

The Ripple Effect: Supporting Women’s Empowerment through Water

New research demonstrates that improving a woman’s access to water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) provides a multitude of indirect and positive impacts that often are overlooked in traditional development interventions. Benefits of this water access “ripple effect” go beyond the time savings and health outcomes that are well known across the sector. Referred to as “pathways to empowerment,” these now-quantifiable impacts cover a range of outcomes, including a more than 50 percent increase in female community leadership positions and shifts in gender norms within the community.