hygiene

Project

Communication for Better Health/Communication for Health Communities

Communication for Healthy Communities (CHC) is a 5-year, USAID funded project whose goal is to support Government of Uganda and partners to design and implement quality health communication interventions that contribute to reduction in HIV Infections, total fertility, maternal & child mortality, malnutrition, malaria & tuberculosis (TB). To achieve this, the project uses innovative health communication (HC) approaches, capacity strengthening, increased collaboration among partners, and rigorous research and knowledge management for health communication.

Final Report

Water, Sanitation, and Education for Health (WASEH II) – Final Report

This report highlights all the aspects of programming of WASEH II project implemented in Kenya from 2004 to 2009 in six districts;: Rachuonyo, Homabay, Nyando, Suba, Migori and Bondo of Nyanza province in western Kenya.

WASEH II is a follow-on project of WASEH I, implemented from from1999 to 2003. 

 

WASEH in full means water, sanitation and education for health.

 

Summary

Mid-term Evaluation of the Kenya Integrated Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (KIWASH) Project: Summary of Findings and Recommendations

The Kenya Integrated Water, Sanitation and Hygiene program (KIWASH) is a $51 million 5-year project (October 2015 to September 2020) funded by USAID/Kenya and East Africa (USAID/KEA) and implemented by a consortium led by DAI. The goal of KIWASH is to improve lives and health through development and management of sustainable water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services in Kenya.

Evaluation

End-Term Performance Evaluation for the USAID/Zambia School Water Supply and Hygiene (WASH) and Quality Education Project

International Business & Technical Consultants, Inc. (IBTCI) prepared this End of Project Performance Evaluation for the USAID/Zambia School Water Supply and Hygiene (WASH) and Quality Education Activity. The main objective of the project was to improve access to water and sanitation services in schools in all 12 districts of Northern and Muchinga Provinces and to promote improved learning outcomes. The $8,209,838 project was implemented by Development Aid from People to People (DAPP) from March 11, 2009 and is scheduled to end September 30, 2013.

Intl Campaign Day

Global Handwashing Day 2019: Clean Hands for All

Celebrated annually on October 15, Global Handwashing Day (GH Day) is an annual global advocacy day dedicated to increasing awareness and understanding about the importance of handwashing with soap as an easy, effective, and affordable way to prevent diseases and save lives. 

Activity

Rwanda Rural Sanitation Activity (Isuku Iwacu)

The Isuku Iwacu Activity (also known as Rwanda Rural Sanitation Activity) is a four-year rural sanitation project awarded on September 2, 2016, and estimated to be completed by November 9, 2020. The Activity is being executed by a consortium of Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) headed by SNV, and includes World Vision International and Water for People.

Annual Report Story

Creating a Vibrant Private Sector-Driven Sanitation Business in Rwanda

Partnering with the Government of Rwanda and local communities, USAID is working to enhance private-sector involvement in rural sanitation markets to help the nation achieve 100 percent improved sanitation coverage by 2020. Meeting this goal means overcoming a number of challenges, including a shortage of sanitation supplies and contractors; a lack of construction professionals involved in household sanitation; the need for a variety of latrine models that function in unique geographies and take consumer preferences and water access into account; and limited financing options.

LiteratureReview

Integrating WASH into NTD Programs: A Desk Review

The USAID Neglected Tropical Disases (NTD) program has programs to eliminate and/or control NTDs in 24 countries. Even as NTDs are eliminated through mass drug administration, the reinfection of these diseases will remain a problem if behaviors and the environment remain unchanged. STH, schistosomiasis, and trachoma are all clearly linked to inadequate sanitation, contaminated food and water, and poor hygiene, providing an opportunity for water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) related approaches to help change behavior and the environment.