floods

Article

Ukraine Increases Efforts to Monitor Forest and Water Health

An estimated 25 percent of Ukraine’s drinking water originates from watersheds. Nearly the entire population of western Ukraine depend on drinking water from mountain forests. The forests which house these watersheds play a key role in regulating water flow, protecting water quality for mountain communities and downstream users, and promoting resilience to floods and droughts. However, these areas are at risk due to increasing timber harvests and other land-use activities in the region.

Article

Republic of the Congo Tackles Soil Erosion Crisis

In September 2018, the U.S. Embassy in Republic of the Congo, together with the U.S. Water Partnership, arranged for two erosion experts from the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) to visit the city of Brazzaville and provide recommendations on treatment and prevention of catastrophic gully erosion that has resulted from planned and unplanned urban development. USFS staff traveled to Congo under the Water Experts Program, a cooperative effort between the U.S. Water Partnership and the U.S. Department of State that deploys American experts to provide technical assistance on water issues.

Article

Satellite Imagery Helps Countries Monitor Changing Water Conditions

SERVIR, a joint NASA and USAID initiative, is building the capacity of water resources departments in national governments in South Asia to use satellite data and hydrologic model products to improve water resource assessments. In Afghanistan and other countries of the Hindu Kush-Himalaya, SERVIR is helping government departments manage their water resources during the critical low-flow period, as well as during roaring floods.

Article

Providing Scientifically Robust Tools for Global Water Security

Understanding the state of global water and implications for U.S. national security requires strategic coordination of the best available science and technical capabilities across the U.S. Government. Spurred by the call for greater interagency collaboration to help address global water security challenges, the Interagency Water Working Group Science and Applications Team (ISAT) was formed by NASA, U.S. Army Corp of Engineers Engineer Research and Development Center (USACE-ERDC), and U.S.

Article

Using Green Infrastructure to Mitigate Urban Flood Risk

With a population of more than 1.5 million people, Udon Thani province in northeastern Thailand is growing and industrializing rapidly as it positions itself as a strategic communications and commercial gateway to Indo-China. While these changes will contribute to economic growth, these shifts along with likely future temperature increases and more extreme weather patterns will also put Udon Thani at a greater risk of water scarcity, flooding, and loss of green space.  Since 2013, the U.S.

Field Guide

Natural and Nature-Based Flood Management: A Green Guide

World Wildlife Fund (WWF), in partnership with the US Agency for International Development Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA), developed this guide (the "Flood Green Guide") to support communities at a local level in using natural and nature-based methods for flood risk management. An interdisciplinary global team developed the Flood Green Guide with a specific focus on advancing the development and application of natural and nature-based methods for managing flood risk.

Blog

Saving Lives, Saving Livelihoods

Flood resilience goes beyond mere survival, say panelists at Sustainable Water Partnership event.

This blog originally appeared on the Sustainable Water Partnership website.

Blog

Staying Afloat

How Cambodia’s erratic water conditions make it the perfect pilot for SWP

Blog

The River Belongs to the People

Team Leader Gordon Mumbo brings a lifetime of experience to the Mara River Basin.

This blog originally appeared on the Sustainable Water Partnership website.

Gordon Mumbo grew up in the small village of Kamuga, in Kenya’s Kisumu County. Year after year, he watched as frequent floods from one of Kenya’s major rivers, the Nyando, disturbed the peaceful flow of village life.