disaster risk reduction

Event

Water as a Tool for Resilience in Times of Crisis

About 90 percent of USAID’s water priority countries are conflict-affected or fragile. Last year, over 60 million people around the world were affected by more than 280 natural disasters. Effective water resource management is complex in times of peace and prosperity. Effective water resource management in a time of crisis—whether war or disaster—can mean the difference between building resilience or compounding tragedy.

Fact Sheet

Fact Sheet: SAREL (Sahel Resilience Learning Project)

Following repeated large-scale humanitarian emergencies in the Sahel Region USAID recognized that continuing to treat these recurrent crises as acute emergencies is extremely costly and does not effectively address their underlying causes. Thus, USAID’s Resilience in the Sahel Enhanced (RISE) initiative realigned existing and new humanitarian and development assistance efforts to strengthen resilience in agro-pastoral and marginal agriculture livelihood zones of the Sahel. 

Overview

Fact Sheet: Resilience in the Sahel-Enhanced (RISE)

West Africa’s Sahel is an arid band stretching 1.1 million square miles from Senegal to Chad with limited annual rainfall. This zone has a combustible mix of deeply rooted chronic poverty, food insecurity, recurrent drought, scattered conflict, and violent extremism that drives the same vulnerable communities into crisis year after year.

Evaluation

REGIS-ER Midterm Performance Evaluation

Following repeated large-scale humanitarian emergencies in the Sahel, USAID recognized that continuing to treat these recurrent crises as acute emergencies is extremely costly and does not effectively address their underlying causes. Resilience and Economic Growth in the Sahel - Enhanced Resilience (REGIS-ER) is a multi-sectoral resilience project that works to end the vicious cycle of crisis and help the Sahel’s most vulnerable populations stay firmly on

Report

Water Under Fire | For Every Child, Water, and Sanitation in Complex Emergencies

In times of crisis, children face many dangers: They are forced from home, separated from family, deprived of food, barred from school, and exposed to exploitation and violence. In crises involving armed conflict, children are threatened by injury and death. But bullets and bombs are not always the deadliest threats to a child’s life. In protracted conflicts, children younger than 15 are, on average, nearly three times more likely to die from diarrheal disease linked to unsafe water and sanitation than violence directly linked to conflict and war.

Article

Republic of the Congo Tackles Soil Erosion Crisis

In September 2018, the U.S. Embassy in Republic of the Congo, together with the U.S. Water Partnership, arranged for two erosion experts from the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) to visit the city of Brazzaville and provide recommendations on treatment and prevention of catastrophic gully erosion that has resulted from planned and unplanned urban development. USFS staff traveled to Congo under the Water Experts Program, a cooperative effort between the U.S. Water Partnership and the U.S. Department of State that deploys American experts to provide technical assistance on water issues.

Article

Harnessing the Power of the Web for Agricultural and Climate Data Analyses

Satellite imagery and remote sensing data assist the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) in formulating monthly estimates of global production of 17 agricultural commodities. Using a wide range of data layers from several sources, the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service (USDA/FAS) developed the Global Agriculture and Disaster Assessment System (GADAS) platform for its analysts and other users to rapidly visualize the current conditions of crops around the world, and compare current conditions to historic trends for a particular crop or place. 

Article

From Satellite to Village, Turning Data into Action

One night in July 2018, a rupture of the Xe Namnoy Xe Pian Dam in Laos sent more than 130 billion gallons of water cascading into downstream communities located along the Xe Pian and Xe Khong rivers in Laos’ Attapeu province, displacing thousands.

Article

Using Green Infrastructure to Mitigate Urban Flood Risk

With a population of more than 1.5 million people, Udon Thani province in northeastern Thailand is growing and industrializing rapidly as it positions itself as a strategic communications and commercial gateway to Indo-China. While these changes will contribute to economic growth, these shifts along with likely future temperature increases and more extreme weather patterns will also put Udon Thani at a greater risk of water scarcity, flooding, and loss of green space.  Since 2013, the U.S.