container-based sanitation

Video

Let’s reinvent the toilet | #WorldToiletDay

We have been using the same toilet system for the past 200 years. The sewer system is safe and clean, but also resource intensive, and many countries cannot afford the water and energy needed. Can there be a new solution? That is the ambition of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) project committee 305 that is working to define a standard for a new type of toilet, which could help meet Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 6 on safe sanitation for all.

Fact Sheet

Fact Sheet: West Africa Sanitation Service Delivery (SSD)

Some of the lowest rates of improved sanitation in the world are found in three project countries: Benin (13 percent), Côte d’Ivoire (14 percent), and Ghana (28 percent). Each country lacks affordable options for safe disposal and treatment of human waste. Densely populated areas, such as slum communities, have limited space to construct household toilets and land disputes coupled with a lack of urban planning complicate this problem.

Report

Evaluating the Potential of Container-Based Sanitation

In the face of urbanization, alternative approaches are needed to deliver adequate and inclusive sanitation services across the full sanitation service chain. Container-based sanitation (CBS) consists of an end-to-end service—that is, one provided along the whole sanitation service chain—that collects excreta hygienically from toilets designed with sealable, removable containers and strives to ensure that the excreta is safely treated, disposed of, and reused.

Article

Turning Waste into Power

In Kenya, more than 95 percent of human fecal sludge is released into the environment untreated or inadequately treated, contributing to a high burden of childhood morbidity and mortality from diarrheal diseases. In addition, charcoal made from illegally logged trees is a major source of cooking fuel in Kenya, contributing to deforestation and to unhealthy indoor air quality.