climate change

Report

What Does Climate Change Mean for the Limpopo Basin?

The objective of the Resilience in the Limpopo Basin Program (RESILIM) of USAID Southern Africa is to enhance the resilience of people and ecosystems in the Limpopo Basin Program (LRB) by strengthening the capacity of the Limpopo Watercourse Commission (LIMCOM), and its key stakeholders, to address issues of climate change adaptation and biodiversity conservation within the context of trans-boundary integrated water resources management (IWRM).

Conference

2019 UNC Water and Health Conference: Where Science Meets Policy

The 2019 Water and Health Conference: Where Science Meets Policy, organized by the Water Institute at UNC explores drinking water supply, sanitation, hygiene and water resources in both the developing and developed worlds with a strong public health emphasis.

Article

Degradation of Kenya’s Water Towers Contribute to Growing Water Crisis

Kenya’s five major forest “water towers”—Mau Forest Complex, Mt. Kenya, Aberdares, Cherangany Hills, and Mt. Elgon—provide an estimated 75 percent of the country’s water resources and are central to Kenya’s economic and social well-being. Water towers are forested, high elevation landscapes from which most of the country’s major rivers (e.g., Tana, Mara, and Ewaso Ng’iro) originate.

Article

Developing Groundwater Maps for Arid Regions of Kenya and Ethiopia

With funding provided by USAID, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and its partners are combining geospatial data from remote sensing with traditional hydrogeological methods to map groundwater resources in two study areas in Kenya and Ethiopia. The primary goals of the project are to locate and quantify the groundwater aquifers in order to support sustainable management of the resource and generate higher success rate when drilling water supply wells, as well training local water resources agency staff and others on the methodology used to develop the maps.

Article

Engaging Communities Through Landscape-Level Water Conservation in Jordan

By 2025, water demand in Jordan will exceed available resources by 26 percent. Shortages are due to rapid internal population growth, an influx of refugees, natural resource extraction, climate change, and excessive groundwater use that is twice the recharge rate. Renewable water supply currently only meets half of total water consumption in the Jordan. Although more than 90 percent of rainfall currently evaporates or runs off, and U.S.

Article

Teaming Up to Improve Efficiency of Water Use for Crop Production

The Middle East Regional Irrigation Management Information System (MERIMIS) project is a quadrilateral effort to help farmers better manage scarce water resources. Started in 2003, MERIMIS involves the U.S. Department of Agriculture and government agencies and NGOs from Jordan, Israel, and the Palestinian Authority. 

Article

Harnessing the Power of the Web for Agricultural and Climate Data Analyses

Satellite imagery and remote sensing data assist the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) in formulating monthly estimates of global production of 17 agricultural commodities. Using a wide range of data layers from several sources, the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service (USDA/FAS) developed the Global Agriculture and Disaster Assessment System (GADAS) platform for its analysts and other users to rapidly visualize the current conditions of crops around the world, and compare current conditions to historic trends for a particular crop or place. 

Article

From Satellite to Village, Turning Data into Action

One night in July 2018, a rupture of the Xe Namnoy Xe Pian Dam in Laos sent more than 130 billion gallons of water cascading into downstream communities located along the Xe Pian and Xe Khong rivers in Laos’ Attapeu province, displacing thousands.

Field Guide

Natural and Nature-Based Flood Management: A Green Guide

World Wildlife Fund (WWF), in partnership with the US Agency for International Development Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA), developed this guide (the "Flood Green Guide") to support communities at a local level in using natural and nature-based methods for flood risk management. An interdisciplinary global team developed the Flood Green Guide with a specific focus on advancing the development and application of natural and nature-based methods for managing flood risk.