agriculture

Toolkit

Water Security Assessment - SWP Toolkit #2

Water Security Assessment is the second in a series of six toolkits from the Sustainable Water Partnership (SWP).  It provides a brief introduction to water security, as well as a detailed walkthrough of SWP’s five-step Water Security Improvement (WSI) process. The approach and focus of a water security assessment process is informed and guided by the WSI space; it can be as exhaustive, specific, or rapid as necessary, depending on stakeholder priorities and the water-related risks they want to address.

Activity

Growth Through Nutrition

Despite great progress, undernutrition rates in Ethiopia remain poor. The key child indicators of stunting, wasting and underweight are at unacceptably high levels nationwide. The key child malnutrition causes in Ethiopia are poor feeding practices (few children eat nutrient-dense vegetables and fruit or animal source foods), suboptimal hygiene and sanitation in the household and community, as well as poverty, food insecurity and gender dynamics.

Water Currents

Water Currents: WASH and Pastoralists

Water Currents is produced biweekly by USAID’s E3 Water Office. Each issue contains recent news and articles on water sector issues, partner and donor updates, latest sector research, and a special focus on one topic. Please provide your feedback and suggestions by contacting the waterteam@usaid.gov.

Toolkit

Improving Water Security - SWP Toolkit #1

The Sustainable Water Partnership is proud to present Toolkit #1, a resource for working to improve water security.  This is the first in a series of six toolkits which presents an effective and efficient process to address water risks, including long-term water stresses that constrain social and economic development and sudden shocks that can quickly ruin the health and livelihoods of vulnerable populations. It provides a brief introduction to water security, as well as a detailed walkthrough of SWP’s five-step Water Security Improvement (WSI) process.

Global Waters Article

Reducing the Drip of Irrigation Energy Costs

Throughout the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, fresh water is being consumed faster than it is being replenished. Irrigation accounts for most of this use. Unlike traditional flood-style or rain-fed irrigation, drip irrigation delivers controlled amounts of water directly to each plant through a series of tubes and emitters. This can reduce agricultural water consumption by 30 to 60 percent and increase crop yields by 20 to 50 percent, yet only 27 percent of the irrigated cropland in MENA countries uses the technology.

Dataset

AQUASTAT

AQUASTAT is the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization's global water information system, developed by the Land and Water Division. It is the most quoted source on global water statistics. AQUASTAT collects, analyzes, and disseminates data and information by country on water resources, water uses, and agricultural water management.

Website

LandLinks

We envision a world in which land governance systems, both formal and informal, are effective, accessible, and responsive for all.