access to improved sanitation

Article

Mobile Communities in Ethiopia Seek Fixed Solutions to Their Water and Sanitation Challenges

Ethiopia’s lowlands represent the final frontier for the country’s ambitious plans to improve water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) coverage through its One WASH National Program. These harsh, arid lands are home to predominantly pastoral communities that roam with their livestock in search of water and grazing lands. Water sources are few and far between, and even when available often do not provide safe drinking water. Open defecation is the norm for a mobile population that lacks a fixed address upon which to build longer-lasting sanitation infrastructure.

Webinar

Webinar: A Review of Market-Based Rural Sanitation Development Programs

The USAID-funded Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Partnerships and Learning for Sustainability (WASHPaLS) project presented an analysis on Tuesday, July 10, 2018 of market-based sanitation (MBS).

The webinar is based on a recently released desk review: Scaling Market-Based Sanitation: Desk Review on Market-Based Rural Sanitation Development Programs. WASHPaLS presented results from a broad survey of MBS programs; a novel framework for understanding barriers to scale; and preliminary recommendations for implementers, funders, and governments.

Event

Urban Sanitation: Meeting the SDGs for Universal Access by 2030

In preparation for the United Nations’ World Toilet Day on November 19, 2016, SID-W, together with AECOM, has assembled a panel of experts to discuss experiences and prospects for achieving universal access to sanitation for urban populations by 2030.

Event

World Water Day 2017 - Why Wastewater?

The theme of the 2017 World Water Day celebration — “Why Wastewater?” — invites us to pause and reflect not only on the importance of water in our daily lives, but also to recognize the central and often overlooked role that proper wastewater treatment can play in fortifying water security at the local, national, and regional levels.

Blog

WASHPaLS’ Webinar Presents Key Findings from CLTS Research

In what has been termed a revolution of sorts, community-led total sanitation (CLTS) introduced a new approach to eliminating open defecation when it was pioneered by Kamal Kar 17 years ago. Since its introduction, approximately 60 countries have adopted CLTS, a technique which triggers communal disgust to change defecation behaviors and expand sanitation coverage in mostly rural communities. A good number of governments have even embraced CLTS as their national policy.