Winrock International

Toolkit

Water Security Planning - SWP Toolkit #3

Water Security Planning is the third in a series of six toolkits from the Sustainable Water Partnership (SWP).  It provides a brief introduction to water security, as well as a detailed walkthrough of SWP’s five-step Water Security Improvement (WSI) process. The toolkit helps users to identify, define, evaluate, and choose water security activities  based on several key areas, such as mitigation of targeted priority water risks, accounting for positive and negative impacts and externalities, socio-economic and environmental impacts, and direct and indirect costs.

Toolkit

Improving Water Security - SWP Toolkit #1

The Sustainable Water Partnership is proud to present Toolkit #1, a resource for working to improve water security.  This is the first in a series of six toolkits which presents an effective and efficient process to address water risks, including long-term water stresses that constrain social and economic development and sudden shocks that can quickly ruin the health and livelihoods of vulnerable populations. It provides a brief introduction to water security, as well as a detailed walkthrough of SWP’s five-step Water Security Improvement (WSI) process.

Activity

Rwanda Integrated Water Security Program

The primary goal of the Rwanda Integrated Water Security Program (RIWSP) is to improve the sustainable management of water quantity and quality to positively impact human health, food security, and resiliency to climate change for vulnerable populations in targeted catchments in Rwanda. The RIWSP program pursued this goal by:

Activity

Tanzania Integrated Water Sanitation and Hygiene Program

The Tanzania Integrated Water Sanitation and Hygiene Program (iWASH) was a USAID-supported initiative implemented by the Global Water for Sustainability (GLOWS) consortium under the leadership of Florida International University (FIU). The key implementing consortium organizations were Winrock International, and CARE International, supported by WaterAid, World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and other local partners and government with input from others such as target communities.

Activity

Water Resources Integration Development Initiative

Tanzania’s health, economy, and food security depend on sustainably managed water resources. However, water scarcity challenges are growing along with the impacts of climate change, while reliable access to safe drinking water and sanitation services is still beyond the reach of far too many people.

Activity

Knowledge-based Integrated Sustainable Agriculture and Nutrition Project

The KISAN project, part of USAID’s global Feed the Future (FTF) initiative, is a $20 million five-year program working to advance food security objectives by increasing agricultural productivity. Nepal was one of 19 countries chosen for the Presidential FTF Initiative in 2010. KISAN builds the capacity of private sector and community based organizations to improve the availability of quality farm inputs; increase access to credit, extension and other services; and improve the competitiveness and efficiency of processors and other buyers.

Activity

Supportive Environment for Health: WASHplus

In Bangladesh, nearly all rural families burn solid fuels for cooking, primarily over very basic mud stoves, resulting in significant smoke exposure, which is closely associated with respiratory illness and premature death, and the release of greenhouse gases. While improved cookstove activities have been underway in Bangladesh for decades, a very small segment of homes have adopted them, despite government subsidy.

Activity

West Africa Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene Program

It is widely recognized that inadequate access to water and sanitation services has enormous health, economic and social consequences. Poor water quality continues to pose a major threat to human health. Diarrheal disease is the second leading cause of death in children under five years old, and is responsible for killing around 760,000 children every year (WHO, 2013). A significant proportion of diarrheal disease can be prevented through safe drinking-water and adequate sanitation and hygiene.