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Water Currents

Water Currents: WASH and Finance

Water Currents is produced biweekly by USAID’s E3 Water Office. Each issue contains recent news and articles on water sector issues, partner and donor updates, latest sector research, and a special focus on one topic. Please provide your feedback and suggestions by contacting the waterteam@usaid.gov.

Water Currents

Water Currents: WASH & Neglected Tropical Diseases

Water Currents is produced biweekly by USAID’s E3 Water Office. Each issue contains recent news and articles on water sector issues, partner and donor updates, latest sector research, and a special focus on one topic. Please provide your feedback and suggestions by contacting the waterteam@usaid.gov.

Water Currents

Water Currents: Celebrating Menstrual Hygiene Day

Water Currents is produced biweekly by USAID’s E3 Water Office. Each issue contains recent news and articles on water sector issues, partner and donor updates, latest sector research, and a special focus on one topic. Please provide your feedback and suggestions by contacting the waterteam@usaid.gov.

Water Currents

Water Currents: WASH and Health Care Facilities

Water Currents is produced biweekly by USAID’s E3 Water Office. Each issue contains recent news and articles on water sector issues, partner and donor updates, latest sector research, and a special focus on one topic. Please provide your feedback and suggestions by contacting the waterteam@usaid.gov.

Activity

Public Action in Water, Energy, and Environment

PAP was a public education and behavior change communications program whose ultimate goals were to increase “efficiency and conservation in the use of water and energy, proper solid waste handling practices, and the introduction of policy changes.” PAP was designed to achieve these goals by building the capacity of Jordanian institutions and organizations to use social marketing as a tool to achieve behavior change in the general population.5 PAP’s Technical Proposal describes an approach in which government agencies, educational institutions, equipment and service providers, and Community

Water Currents

Water Currents: Community-Led Total Sanitation

Water Currents is produced biweekly by USAID’s E3 Water Office. Each issue contains recent news and articles on water sector issues, partner and donor updates, latest sector research, and a special focus on one topic. Please provide your feedback and suggestions by contacting the waterteam@usaid.gov.

Water Currents

Water Currents: Water Utilities

This edition of the newsletter, focusing on water utilities, includes studies on how water utilities perform in Pakistan and several African countries, and features a report on why a water utility in Bangladesh has emerged as a model for public water utilities across South Asia. 

Water Currents

Water Currents: World Water Day 2017

Water Currents is produced biweekly by USAID’s E3 Water Office. Each issue contains recent news and articles on water sector issues, partner and donor updates, latest sector research, and a special focus on one topic. Please provide your feedback and suggestions by contacting the waterteam@usaid.gov.

Evaluation

Final Performance Evaluation of the Public Action for Water, Energy and Environment Project (PAP)

The purpose of evaluating the Public Action for Water, Energy and Environment Project (PAP) is to assess its approach and outcomes in order to guide future program design. The evaluation considers effectiveness of mechanisms and implementation practices, lessons learned, sustainability of PAP relationships with counterparts, and behavior change among consumers and institutions relative to energy and water conservation, and solid waste management.

Activity

Water Communications and Knowledge Management

More than 660 million people meet each new day without safe drinking water. One in three people still lack access to a toilet, and every day more than 350,000 children are born into a world that produces less food than it did the day before. Water is a vital resource not just for humans, but also for a variety of aquatic ecosystems, including wetlands, watersheds, rivers, estuaries and coastal areas. By 2025, two-thirds of the world’s population could be living in water-stressed conditions.