Water Access, Sanitation and Hygiene for Urban Poor – Ghana (WASH-UP)

 

In 2009, USAID awarded the three-year, $4.5 million Ghana WASH-UP activity to Global Communities (formerly CHF International). USAID subsequently funded two extensions of WASH-UP, which brought the period of performance to seven years (October 2009 through September 2016) and total funding to $12,168,660. WASH-UP focused on increasing equitable access to improved water supply and basic sanitation for the urban poor, improving governance for WASH, and decreasing the prevalence of water-related disease through behavior change communication (BCC) interventions. 

USAID implemented the WASH-UP program under the African Urban Poor Improved Water Supply and Sanitation (AUP-IWS) program. The program formed part of the efforts to contribute to the achievements of Ghana‘s Millennium Development Goals (MDG’s) targets in water and sanitation, and the United States Senator Paul Simon Water for the Poor Act of 2005, which aims at improving water supply and sanitation for the urban poor. WASH-UP was initially a three year project that started in October 2009 in slum communities of the two major cities of Accra and Takoradi, Ghana. The goal of the project was to increase equitable access to improved water supply and basic sanitation for poor urban communities in Ghana by improving water supply and sanitation infrastructure, proper disposal of wastewater, behavior change, and governance.

Activity Description

To increase equitable access to improved water supply and basic sanitation facilities for the poor, WASH-UP pursued five main objectives:

  1. Increase household access to improved drinking water
  2. Increase household access to improved and sustainable sanitation
  3. Promote innovative economic enterprises in the areas of water and sanitation
  4. Improve hygiene and sanitation behaviors among the urban poor. 
  5. Strengthen local governance for water supply, sanitation service, and hygiene promotion.

Actual Outcomes

  • 2,715 households installed connections to piped water
  • 516 community water points improved
  • 2,711 households installed private latrines
  • 527 micro entrepreneurs trained in entrepreneurship
  • 2,454 households have hand-washing supplies
  • 289 community volunteers trained to disseminate hygiene and sanitation behavior change messages. 69,938 people have been reached